Post-traumatic stress disorder and cardiovascular disease

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This review provides an up-to-date summary of the evidence from clinical and epidemiologic studies indicating that persons with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may have an increased risk of coronary heart disease and possibly thromboembolic stroke. Persons with PTSD, a common anxiety disorder in both veteran and nonveteran populations, have been reported to have an increased risk of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity, and cardiovascular disease. Increased activity of the sympathoadrenal axis may contribute to cardiovascular disease through the effects of catecholamines on the heart, vasculature, and platelet function. Reported links between PTSD and hypertension and other cardiovascular risk factors may partly account for reported associations between PTSD and heart disease. The associations observed between PTSD and cardiovascular diseases have implications for cardiology practice and research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)164-170
Number of pages7
JournalOpen Cardiovascular Medicine Journal
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 11 2011

Fingerprint

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Cardiovascular Diseases
Hypertension
Veterans
Hyperlipidemias
Anxiety Disorders
Cardiology
Catecholamines
Coronary Disease
Epidemiologic Studies
Heart Diseases
Blood Platelets
Obesity
Stroke
Research
Population

Keywords

  • Anxiety disorders
  • Coronary heart disease
  • Hyperlipidemia
  • Hypertension
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Stroke
  • Veterans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Post-traumatic stress disorder and cardiovascular disease. / Coughlin, Steven S.

In: Open Cardiovascular Medicine Journal, Vol. 5, No. 1, 11.10.2011, p. 164-170.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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