Postoperative seizures following the resection of convexity meningiomas: Are prophylactic anticonvulsants indicated?: Clinical article

Michael E. Sughrue, Martin J. Rutkowski, Edward F. Chang, Gopal Shangari, Ari J. Kane, Michael W. Mcdermott, Mitchel S. Berger, Andrew T. Parsa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

Object. Seizures in the perioperative period are a well-recognized clinical entity in the setting of brain tumor surgery. At present, the suitability of antiepileptic prophylaxis in patients following brain tumor surgery is unclear, especially in those without prior seizures. Given the paucity of tumor-type and site-specific data, the authors evaluated the incidence of postoperative seizures in patients with convexity meningiomas and no prior seizures. Methods. The authors identified 180 patients with no preoperative history of seizures who underwent resection of a convexity meningioma. Some patients received antiepileptic prophylaxis for 7 days postoperatively while others did not, based on the practice patterns of different attendings. The rates of clinically evident seizures in the first 3-4 weeks after surgery were compared. Results. Patients who received antiepilepsy drugs (129 patients) did not significantly differ from those who did not (51 patients) in terms of age, sex, WHO tumor grade, extent of resection, rate of previous cranial surgery or radiation therapies, or use of preoperative embolization. There was a single new postoperative seizure in the entire cohort, yielding a new seizure rate of 1.9% in patients not on antiepileptic prophylaxis compared with 0% in patients on antiepileptics (p = not significant). Conclusions. While it is thought that the routine use of prophylactic antiepileptics may prevent new seizures in patients undergoing surgery for a convexity meningioma, the rate of new seizures in untreated patients is probably very low. Data in this study call into question whether the cost and side effects of these medications are worth the small benefit their administration may confer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)705-709
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of neurosurgery
Volume114
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Antiepileptic agent
  • Meningioma
  • Seizure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this