Potential of colony-stimulating factors to improve host defense in organ transplant recipients

Jian Xu, Sonja von Aulock, Rudolf Lucas, Albrecht Wendel

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In dexamethasone-treated PBMC isolated from control patients, or in cells obtained from immunosuppressed liver transplant patients, GM-CSF was found to selectively restore the innate immune response, without activating the specific immune response implicated in graft rejection. Moreover, GM-CSF efficiently restored the immune response against an otherwise lethal bacterial infection in immunosuppressed mice, without inducing the rejection of a skin transplant. These recent data could have implications for clinical practice and suggest a more detailed evaluation of agents with similar actions to GM-CSF in the restoration of innate immunity in organ transplant patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)411-417
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Organ Transplantation
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004

Fingerprint

Colony-Stimulating Factors
Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
Transplants
Innate Immunity
Graft Rejection
Bacterial Infections
Dexamethasone
Skin
Liver
Transplant Recipients

Keywords

  • G-CSF
  • GM-CSF
  • Immunity
  • Infection
  • Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Potential of colony-stimulating factors to improve host defense in organ transplant recipients. / Xu, Jian; von Aulock, Sonja; Lucas, Rudolf; Wendel, Albrecht.

In: Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation, Vol. 9, No. 4, 01.12.2004, p. 411-417.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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