Predictors of inpatient mortality and systemic complications in acetabular fractures requiring operative treatment

Nicholas Kusnezov, Julia Bader, James A. Blair

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Patient demographics, physiologic variables, and injury characteristics predictive of mortality and major systemic complications following operative fixation of acetabulum fractures were identified using the National Sample Program of the National Trauma Data Bank. Age older than 60 years, obesity, and Injury Severity Score greater than 15 portended a statistically significant increase in mortality and major systemic complications (P?.05). Systolic blood pressure less than 90 mm Hg and Glasgow Coma Scale score less than 8 were also significant predictors of mortality and major systemic complications (P<.0001). Time to surgery and hospital length of stay did not affect mortality. The most common potentially modifiable risk factors were smoking (22.3%) and obesity (body mass index ?30 kg/m2) (9.1%). Increasing age, Injury Severity Score, and obesity independently predicted a statistically significant increase in both mortality and major systemic complications. A better understanding of the associated risk factors and unique complication profile will provide orthopedic surgeons with a basis on which to effectively counsel and care for patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e223-e228
JournalOrthopedics
Volume40
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Predictors of inpatient mortality and systemic complications in acetabular fractures requiring operative treatment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this