Predictors of marital stability 2 years following traumatic brain injury

Juan Carlos Arango-Lasprilla, Jessica McKinney Ketchum, Taryn Dezfulian, Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, Therese M. O'neil-Pirozzi, Flora Hammond, Amitabh Jha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of the present study was to determine the predictors of continuous marital stability over 2 years post-injury and examine the moderating effects of ethnicity. Design: Retrospective study. Setting: Longitudinal dataset of the TBI Model Systems National Database. Participants: Nine hundred and seventy-seven individuals with primarily moderate-to-severe TBI (751 Caucasians and 226 minorities) hospitalized between 1989-2005. Main outcomes: Marital stability was defined as 'stably married' (married at admission and married at follow-up years 1 and 2) and 'unstably married' (being single, divorced or separated at any of the two follow-up years). Results: Across the 2 years post-injury, 85% of study participants who reported being married upon admission for TBI had stable marital status, while 15% indicated being separated or divorced. Younger age, being a male with a TBI, suffering a TBI as a result of a violent injury and having moderate injury severity predicted marital instability. Furthermore, within minorities, increases in disability resulted in a higher likelihood of being stably married. Conclusions: These research findings are clinically relevant and assist marital/couples/family intervention therapists and/or rehabilitation professionals to design programmes early after injury to target these at risk couples. Further research on the modifiable factors contributing to marital instability after TBI and potential moderators is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)565-574
Number of pages10
JournalBrain Injury
Volume22
Issue number7-8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

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Wounds and Injuries
Divorce
Marital Status
Research
Rehabilitation
Retrospective Studies
Traumatic Brain Injury
Predictors
Databases
Admission
Minorities
Datasets
Ethnic Groups
Data Base

Keywords

  • Ethnicity
  • Marital stability
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Arango-Lasprilla, J. C., Ketchum, J. M., Dezfulian, T., Kreutzer, J. S., O'neil-Pirozzi, T. M., Hammond, F., & Jha, A. (2008). Predictors of marital stability 2 years following traumatic brain injury. Brain Injury, 22(7-8), 565-574. https://doi.org/10.1080/02699050802172004

Predictors of marital stability 2 years following traumatic brain injury. / Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos; Ketchum, Jessica McKinney; Dezfulian, Taryn; Kreutzer, Jeffrey S.; O'neil-Pirozzi, Therese M.; Hammond, Flora; Jha, Amitabh.

In: Brain Injury, Vol. 22, No. 7-8, 01.01.2008, p. 565-574.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Arango-Lasprilla, JC, Ketchum, JM, Dezfulian, T, Kreutzer, JS, O'neil-Pirozzi, TM, Hammond, F & Jha, A 2008, 'Predictors of marital stability 2 years following traumatic brain injury', Brain Injury, vol. 22, no. 7-8, pp. 565-574. https://doi.org/10.1080/02699050802172004
Arango-Lasprilla JC, Ketchum JM, Dezfulian T, Kreutzer JS, O'neil-Pirozzi TM, Hammond F et al. Predictors of marital stability 2 years following traumatic brain injury. Brain Injury. 2008 Jan 1;22(7-8):565-574. https://doi.org/10.1080/02699050802172004
Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos ; Ketchum, Jessica McKinney ; Dezfulian, Taryn ; Kreutzer, Jeffrey S. ; O'neil-Pirozzi, Therese M. ; Hammond, Flora ; Jha, Amitabh. / Predictors of marital stability 2 years following traumatic brain injury. In: Brain Injury. 2008 ; Vol. 22, No. 7-8. pp. 565-574.
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