Preparing dental students and residents to overcome internal and external barriers to evidence-based practice

Brandon G. Coleman, Thomas M. Johnson, Kenneth J. Erley, Richard Topolski, Michael Rethman, Douglas D. Lancaster

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In recent years, evidence-based dentistry has become the ideal for research, academia, and clinical practice. However, barriers to implementation are many, including the complexity of interpreting conflicting evidence as well as difficulties in accessing it. Furthermore, many proponents of evidence-based care seem to assume that good evidence consistently exists and that clinicians can and will objectively evaluate data so as to apply the best evidence to individual patients' needs. The authors argue that these shortcomings may mislead many clinicians and that students should be adequately prepared to cope with some of the more complex issues surrounding evidence-based practice. Cognitive biases and heuristics shape every aspect of our lives, including our professional behavior. This article reviews literature from medicine, psychology, and behavioral economics to explore the barriers to implementing evidence-based dentistry. Internal factors include biases that affect clinical decision making: hindsight bias, optimism bias, survivor bias, and blind-spot bias. External factors include publication bias, corporate bias, and lack of transparency that may skew the available evidence in the peer-reviewed literature. Raising awareness of how these biases exert subtle influence on decision making and patient care can lead to a more nuanced discussion of addressing and overcoming barriers to evidence-based practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1161-1169
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of dental education
Volume80
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016

Fingerprint

Evidence-Based Dentistry
Dental Students
Evidence-Based Practice
Behavioral Economics
resident
Publication Bias
Optic Disk
trend
evidence
Survivors
Decision Making
Patient Care
student
Medicine
Students
Psychology
dentistry
Research
decision making
optimism

Keywords

  • Bias
  • Cognition
  • Dental education
  • Evidence-based dentistry
  • Evidence-based practice
  • Human performance factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Coleman, B. G., Johnson, T. M., Erley, K. J., Topolski, R., Rethman, M., & Lancaster, D. D. (2016). Preparing dental students and residents to overcome internal and external barriers to evidence-based practice. Journal of dental education, 80(10), 1161-1169.

Preparing dental students and residents to overcome internal and external barriers to evidence-based practice. / Coleman, Brandon G.; Johnson, Thomas M.; Erley, Kenneth J.; Topolski, Richard; Rethman, Michael; Lancaster, Douglas D.

In: Journal of dental education, Vol. 80, No. 10, 01.10.2016, p. 1161-1169.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Coleman, BG, Johnson, TM, Erley, KJ, Topolski, R, Rethman, M & Lancaster, DD 2016, 'Preparing dental students and residents to overcome internal and external barriers to evidence-based practice', Journal of dental education, vol. 80, no. 10, pp. 1161-1169.
Coleman, Brandon G. ; Johnson, Thomas M. ; Erley, Kenneth J. ; Topolski, Richard ; Rethman, Michael ; Lancaster, Douglas D. / Preparing dental students and residents to overcome internal and external barriers to evidence-based practice. In: Journal of dental education. 2016 ; Vol. 80, No. 10. pp. 1161-1169.
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