Preparing digitized cervigrams for colposcopy research and education: Determination of optimal resolution and compression parameters

Jose Jeronimo, Rodney Long, Leif Neve, Daron Gale Ferris, Kenneth Noller, Mark Spitzer, Sunanda Mitra, Jiangling Guo, Brian Nutter, Phil Castle, Rolando Herrero, Ana Cecilia Rodriguez, Mark Schiffman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Visual assessment of digitized cervigrams through the Internet needs to be optimized. The National Cancer Institute and National Library of Medicine are involved in a large effort to improve colposcopic assessment and, in preparation, are conducting methodologic research. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We selected 50 cervigrams with diagnoses ranging from normal to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 or invasive cancer. Those pictures were scanned at 5 resolution levels from 1,550 to 4,000 dots per inch (dpi) and were presented to 4 expert colposcopists to assess image quality. After the ideal resolution level was determined, pictures were compressed at 7 compression ratios from 20:1 to 80:1 to determine the optimal level of compression that permitted full assessment of key visual details. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences between the 3,000 and 4,000 dpi pictures. At 2,000 dpi resolution, only one colposcopist found a slightly statistically significant difference (p = 0.02) compared with the gold standard. There was a clear loss of quality of the pictures at 1,660 dpi. At compression ratio 60:1, 3 of 4 evaluators found statistically significant differences when comparing against the gold standard. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that 2,000 dpi is the optimal level for digitizing cervigrams, and the optimal compression ratio is 50:1 using a novel wavelet-based technology. At these parameters, pictures have no significant differences with the gold standard.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-44
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Lower Genital Tract Disease
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006

Fingerprint

Colposcopy
Education
Research
National Library of Medicine (U.S.)
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Internet
Technology
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Cervical cancer
  • Cervigram
  • Colposcopy
  • Compression
  • Digitization
  • Scanning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Preparing digitized cervigrams for colposcopy research and education : Determination of optimal resolution and compression parameters. / Jeronimo, Jose; Long, Rodney; Neve, Leif; Ferris, Daron Gale; Noller, Kenneth; Spitzer, Mark; Mitra, Sunanda; Guo, Jiangling; Nutter, Brian; Castle, Phil; Herrero, Rolando; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark.

In: Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.01.2006, p. 39-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jeronimo, J, Long, R, Neve, L, Ferris, DG, Noller, K, Spitzer, M, Mitra, S, Guo, J, Nutter, B, Castle, P, Herrero, R, Rodriguez, AC & Schiffman, M 2006, 'Preparing digitized cervigrams for colposcopy research and education: Determination of optimal resolution and compression parameters', Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 39-44. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.lgt.0000192696.93172.ae
Jeronimo, Jose ; Long, Rodney ; Neve, Leif ; Ferris, Daron Gale ; Noller, Kenneth ; Spitzer, Mark ; Mitra, Sunanda ; Guo, Jiangling ; Nutter, Brian ; Castle, Phil ; Herrero, Rolando ; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia ; Schiffman, Mark. / Preparing digitized cervigrams for colposcopy research and education : Determination of optimal resolution and compression parameters. In: Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease. 2006 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. 39-44.
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AU - Mitra, Sunanda

AU - Guo, Jiangling

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AU - Herrero, Rolando

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