Presentation and management of extensive fronto-orbital-ethmoid mucoceles

Mark Herndon, Kevin Christopher McMains, Stilianos E Kountakis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study was to report the presentation and management of extensive fronto-orbital-ethmoid (FOE) mucoceles. Methods: This study is a retrospective chart review of 13 consecutive patients requiring surgical intervention for extensive FOE mucoceles. Patients were treated over the period from 1999 to 2003. Variables examined include chief complaint, risk factors, location of erosion, management, and complications. Follow-up ranged from 12 to 36 months. Results: Most common chief complaint was eye proptosis, followed by forehead swelling and orbital cellulitis. Four patients had previous functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) and another 4 patients had history of prior trauma and frontal sinus obliteration. Eleven patients had skull base erosion and 12 had orbital wall erosion. Four patients were managed endoscopically. Of these, 1 had previously undergone FESS, whereas the other 3 had no risk factors. All patients with prior trauma/obliteration were treated with coronal flap and frontal sinus obliteration. One patient who had undergone 2 previous FESS was successfully treated with coronal flap without obliteration. One patient treated with an osteoplastic flap had cerebrospinal fluid leak that was identified and repaired intraoperatively with a pericranial flap. Conclusion: Extensive FOE mucoceles can be successfully and safely treated by endoscopic and non-endoscopic methods. The choice of surgical approach mainly depends on the anatomy of the frontal recess. Prior trauma and FESS are associated with requiring coronal flap and frontal sinus obliteration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-147
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2007

Fingerprint

Mucocele
Frontal Sinus
Wounds and Injuries
Orbital Cellulitis
Exophthalmos
Forehead
Skull Base
Anatomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Presentation and management of extensive fronto-orbital-ethmoid mucoceles. / Herndon, Mark; McMains, Kevin Christopher; Kountakis, Stilianos E.

In: American Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery, Vol. 28, No. 3, 01.05.2007, p. 145-147.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{579e7cbc359c4cc2ac4a98829b77b4f9,
title = "Presentation and management of extensive fronto-orbital-ethmoid mucoceles",
abstract = "Objectives: The aim of the study was to report the presentation and management of extensive fronto-orbital-ethmoid (FOE) mucoceles. Methods: This study is a retrospective chart review of 13 consecutive patients requiring surgical intervention for extensive FOE mucoceles. Patients were treated over the period from 1999 to 2003. Variables examined include chief complaint, risk factors, location of erosion, management, and complications. Follow-up ranged from 12 to 36 months. Results: Most common chief complaint was eye proptosis, followed by forehead swelling and orbital cellulitis. Four patients had previous functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) and another 4 patients had history of prior trauma and frontal sinus obliteration. Eleven patients had skull base erosion and 12 had orbital wall erosion. Four patients were managed endoscopically. Of these, 1 had previously undergone FESS, whereas the other 3 had no risk factors. All patients with prior trauma/obliteration were treated with coronal flap and frontal sinus obliteration. One patient who had undergone 2 previous FESS was successfully treated with coronal flap without obliteration. One patient treated with an osteoplastic flap had cerebrospinal fluid leak that was identified and repaired intraoperatively with a pericranial flap. Conclusion: Extensive FOE mucoceles can be successfully and safely treated by endoscopic and non-endoscopic methods. The choice of surgical approach mainly depends on the anatomy of the frontal recess. Prior trauma and FESS are associated with requiring coronal flap and frontal sinus obliteration.",
author = "Mark Herndon and McMains, {Kevin Christopher} and Kountakis, {Stilianos E}",
year = "2007",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.amjoto.2006.07.010",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "28",
pages = "145--147",
journal = "American Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery",
issn = "0196-0709",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Presentation and management of extensive fronto-orbital-ethmoid mucoceles

AU - Herndon, Mark

AU - McMains, Kevin Christopher

AU - Kountakis, Stilianos E

PY - 2007/5/1

Y1 - 2007/5/1

N2 - Objectives: The aim of the study was to report the presentation and management of extensive fronto-orbital-ethmoid (FOE) mucoceles. Methods: This study is a retrospective chart review of 13 consecutive patients requiring surgical intervention for extensive FOE mucoceles. Patients were treated over the period from 1999 to 2003. Variables examined include chief complaint, risk factors, location of erosion, management, and complications. Follow-up ranged from 12 to 36 months. Results: Most common chief complaint was eye proptosis, followed by forehead swelling and orbital cellulitis. Four patients had previous functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) and another 4 patients had history of prior trauma and frontal sinus obliteration. Eleven patients had skull base erosion and 12 had orbital wall erosion. Four patients were managed endoscopically. Of these, 1 had previously undergone FESS, whereas the other 3 had no risk factors. All patients with prior trauma/obliteration were treated with coronal flap and frontal sinus obliteration. One patient who had undergone 2 previous FESS was successfully treated with coronal flap without obliteration. One patient treated with an osteoplastic flap had cerebrospinal fluid leak that was identified and repaired intraoperatively with a pericranial flap. Conclusion: Extensive FOE mucoceles can be successfully and safely treated by endoscopic and non-endoscopic methods. The choice of surgical approach mainly depends on the anatomy of the frontal recess. Prior trauma and FESS are associated with requiring coronal flap and frontal sinus obliteration.

AB - Objectives: The aim of the study was to report the presentation and management of extensive fronto-orbital-ethmoid (FOE) mucoceles. Methods: This study is a retrospective chart review of 13 consecutive patients requiring surgical intervention for extensive FOE mucoceles. Patients were treated over the period from 1999 to 2003. Variables examined include chief complaint, risk factors, location of erosion, management, and complications. Follow-up ranged from 12 to 36 months. Results: Most common chief complaint was eye proptosis, followed by forehead swelling and orbital cellulitis. Four patients had previous functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) and another 4 patients had history of prior trauma and frontal sinus obliteration. Eleven patients had skull base erosion and 12 had orbital wall erosion. Four patients were managed endoscopically. Of these, 1 had previously undergone FESS, whereas the other 3 had no risk factors. All patients with prior trauma/obliteration were treated with coronal flap and frontal sinus obliteration. One patient who had undergone 2 previous FESS was successfully treated with coronal flap without obliteration. One patient treated with an osteoplastic flap had cerebrospinal fluid leak that was identified and repaired intraoperatively with a pericranial flap. Conclusion: Extensive FOE mucoceles can be successfully and safely treated by endoscopic and non-endoscopic methods. The choice of surgical approach mainly depends on the anatomy of the frontal recess. Prior trauma and FESS are associated with requiring coronal flap and frontal sinus obliteration.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34247854745&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34247854745&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.amjoto.2006.07.010

DO - 10.1016/j.amjoto.2006.07.010

M3 - Article

VL - 28

SP - 145

EP - 147

JO - American Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery

JF - American Journal of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Medicine and Surgery

SN - 0196-0709

IS - 3

ER -