Pressure-independent cerebrovascular remodelling and changes in myogenic reactivity in diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rat in response to glycaemic control

A. Kelly-Cobbs, M. M. Elgebaly, Weiguo Li, Adviye Ergul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: We have shown hypertrophic cerebrovascular remodelling in the Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat model of diabetes. This study tested the hypotheses that (1) vascular remodelling develops as the disease progresses and alters myogenic reactivity of resistance vessels important for regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF), and (2) glycaemic control prevents cerebrovascular remodelling and myogenic dysfunction. Methods: Middle cerebral artery (MCA) lumen diameter, media:lumen (M:L) ratio, cross-sectional area (CSA) and myogenic tone were measured in 10- and 18-week-old control Wistar and diabetic GK rats using pressurized arteriograph (n=8-14/group). Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was measured with telemetry (n=5/group). Additional GK rats were treated with metformin (300mgkg -1day -1) for glycaemic control starting at 7weeks after the onset of diabetes until 18weeks (n=9). Results: In the control group, there was no difference in remodelling indices, myogenic tone or MAP between ages. Eighteen week diabetic rats displayed increased M:L ratio and CSA, but decreased lumen diameter and myogenic tone compared to 10-week GK or 18-week control rats. MAP increased starting around 10weeks of age and remained slightly higher in the GK rats. Glycaemic control normalized M:L ratio, CSA, lumen diameter and myogenic tone with no effect on blood pressure. Conclusions: These findings suggest that diabetic rats develop MCA remodelling as the disease progresses but this is associated with impaired myogenic reactivity which may ultimately affect CBF. Our results also provide evidence that glycaemic control is an effective therapeutic strategy to prevent cerebrovascular remodelling and dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)245-251
Number of pages7
JournalActa Physiologica
Volume203
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2011

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Arterial Pressure
Pressure
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Middle Cerebral Artery
Telemetry
Metformin
Blood Pressure
Control Groups
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Middle cerebral artery
  • Myogenic tone
  • Vascular remodelling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Pressure-independent cerebrovascular remodelling and changes in myogenic reactivity in diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rat in response to glycaemic control. / Kelly-Cobbs, A.; Elgebaly, M. M.; Li, Weiguo; Ergul, Adviye.

In: Acta Physiologica, Vol. 203, No. 1, 01.09.2011, p. 245-251.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kelly-Cobbs, A. ; Elgebaly, M. M. ; Li, Weiguo ; Ergul, Adviye. / Pressure-independent cerebrovascular remodelling and changes in myogenic reactivity in diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rat in response to glycaemic control. In: Acta Physiologica. 2011 ; Vol. 203, No. 1. pp. 245-251.
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