Prevalence and severity of hypertension in a dental hygiene clinic

Ana L Thompson, Marie A. Collins, Mary Cannon Downey, Wayne William Herman, Joseph Louis Konzelman, Sue Tucker Ward, Cynthia T Hughes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and severity of hypertension in a dental hygiene clinic and evaluate factors related to the disease. Methods and Materials: Records of 615 patients, treated by dental hygiene students during 2003, were reviewed. Data collected included systolic and diastolic blood pressure, presence of diabetes and renal disease, non-modifiers (race, gender, and age), and modifiers (marital status, smoking habits, and occupation). Results: According to the Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on the Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC7) classification, 154 (25%) of the subjects had normal blood pressure readings, 374 (60.8%) had prehypertension, and 87 (14.1%) had stage 1 hypertension. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference in the JNC7 classification between groups when considering the non-modifiers' race (p=.02) and the modifiers' smoking habits (p=.03) and occupation (p=.01). A statistically significant difference in the JNC7 classification existed between groups with diabetes (p=.00). The majority of patients had blood pressure readings in the prehypertension stage. Conclusion: Based on these results, the researchers recommend clinical policy modifications which include: additional documentation for blood pressure readings in the prehypertension stage, lowering the systolic reading from 160 mmHg to 140 mmHg when adding hypertension alert labels, and noting prehypertension/hypertension on the dental hygiene care plan with the appropriate interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Contemporary Dental Practice
Volume8
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007

Fingerprint

Dental Clinics
Oral Hygiene
Prehypertension
Reading
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Occupations
Habits
Dental Insurance
Smoking
Dental Students
Marital Status
Documentation
Research Personnel
Kidney

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Dental hygiene education
  • Hypertension
  • JNC7 classification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Prevalence and severity of hypertension in a dental hygiene clinic. / Thompson, Ana L; Collins, Marie A.; Downey, Mary Cannon; Herman, Wayne William; Konzelman, Joseph Louis; Ward, Sue Tucker; Hughes, Cynthia T.

In: Journal of Contemporary Dental Practice, Vol. 8, No. 3, 01.03.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thompson, Ana L ; Collins, Marie A. ; Downey, Mary Cannon ; Herman, Wayne William ; Konzelman, Joseph Louis ; Ward, Sue Tucker ; Hughes, Cynthia T. / Prevalence and severity of hypertension in a dental hygiene clinic. In: Journal of Contemporary Dental Practice. 2007 ; Vol. 8, No. 3.
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