Prevalence and severity of periodontal disease at mandibular molar teeth in smokers with regular oral hygiene habits

Varunee Kerdvongbundit, Ulf M E Wikesjö

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Smoking appears to be detrimental to health because it has been associated with several diseases including cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Smoking also appears to be a major environmental factor associated with periodontal disease progression. The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and severity of periodontal destruction as influenced by smoking in a Thai population. Methods: Gingival health and periodontal conditions at mandibular molar furcation sites in 120 Thai dental patients (60: smokers and 60 never-smokers, age range 31 to 60 years) with generally high oral hygiene standards and regular dental care habits were evaluated. Results: Smokers exhibited more frequent and severe mandibular molar periodontal destruction than never-smokers. The prevalence and severity of gingival recession, periodontal pocket formation, clinical attachment loss, furcation involvement, and tooth mobility were significantly increased in smokers compared to never-smokers. Seventy-three percent of the smokers exhibited furcation involvement in contrast to only 20% of the never-smokers. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that smoking appears to be a major environmental factor associated with accelerated periodontal destruction in adult smokers with generally high oral hygiene standards and regular dental care habits in a Thai population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)735-740
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of periodontology
Volume73
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 27 2002

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Disease progression
  • Furcation/etiology
  • Periodontal disease/etiology
  • Smoking/adverse effects
  • Tobacco/adverse effects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Periodontics

Cite this