Prevalence of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity in the United States clinical antipsychotic trials of intervention effectiveness study population

Nicola G. Cascella, Debra Kryszak, Bushra Bhatti, Patricia Gregory, Deanna L. Kelly, Joseph P. Mc Evoy, Alessio Fasano, William W. Eaton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

102 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Celiac disease (CD) and schizophrenia have approximately the same prevalence, but epidemiologic data show higher prevalence of CD among schizophrenia patients. The reason for this higher co-occurrence is not known, but the clinical knowledge about the presence of immunologic markers for CD or gluten intolerance in schizophrenia patients may have implications for treatment. Our goal was to evaluate antibody prevalence to gliadin (AGA), transglutaminase (tTG), and endomysium (EMA) in a group of individuals with schizophrenia and a comparison group. AGA, tTG, and EMA antibodies were assayed in 1401 schizophrenia patients who were part of the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness study and 900 controls. Psychopathology in schizophrenia patients was assessed using the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS). Logistic regression was used to assess the difference in the frequency of AGA, immunoglobulin A (IgA), and tTG antibodies, adjusting for age, sex, and race. Linear regression was used to predict PANSS scores from AGA and tTG antibodies adjusting for age, gender, and race. Among schizophrenia patients, 23.1% had moderate to high levels of IgA-AGA compared with 3.1% of the comparison group (χ2 = 1885, df=2, P <. 001.) Moderate to high levels of tTG antibodies were present in 5.4% of schizophrenia patients vs 0.80% of the comparison group (χ2=392.0, df=2, P <. 001). Adjustments for sex, age, and race had trivial effects on the differences. Regression analyses failed to predict PANSS scores from AGA and tTG antibodies. Persons with schizophrenia have higher than expected titers of antibodies related to CD and gluten sensitivity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)94-100
Number of pages7
JournalSchizophrenia Bulletin
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Glutens
Celiac Disease
Antipsychotic Agents
Schizophrenia
Clinical Trials
Population
Antibodies
Immunoglobulin A
Gliadin
Transglutaminases
Psychopathology
Linear Models
Biomarkers
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • EMA antibodies
  • PANSS
  • anti-gliadin IgA antibodies
  • tTG antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Prevalence of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity in the United States clinical antipsychotic trials of intervention effectiveness study population. / Cascella, Nicola G.; Kryszak, Debra; Bhatti, Bushra; Gregory, Patricia; Kelly, Deanna L.; Mc Evoy, Joseph P.; Fasano, Alessio; Eaton, William W.

In: Schizophrenia Bulletin, Vol. 37, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 94-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cascella, Nicola G. ; Kryszak, Debra ; Bhatti, Bushra ; Gregory, Patricia ; Kelly, Deanna L. ; Mc Evoy, Joseph P. ; Fasano, Alessio ; Eaton, William W. / Prevalence of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity in the United States clinical antipsychotic trials of intervention effectiveness study population. In: Schizophrenia Bulletin. 2011 ; Vol. 37, No. 1. pp. 94-100.
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