Primary care of adult survivors of childhood cancer

Dean Seehusen, Drew Baird, David Bode

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There are approximately 300,000 survivors of childhood cancer in the United States, and most of them receive their medical care from primary care physicians. Adult survivors of childhood cancer are at considerable risk of long-term morbidity and mortality beyond the recurrence of their primary malignancy. Late adverse effects can impair organ function, stunt growth and development, and cause neurocognitive dysfunction and secondary malignancies. To address the need for systematic, comprehensive care of this expanding high-risk patient population, the Children's Oncology Group has developed long-term follow-up guidelines. Proper use of these guidelines will allow primary care physicians to understand a patient's individual risk, provide additional screening as needed, and identify late adverse effects of childhood cancer early. The foundation of the care of an adult survivor of a childhood cancer is a complete, accurate account of the patient's cancer and subsequent therapy in the form of a Summary of Cancer Treatment. A complete Summary of Cancer Treatment allows a primary care physician to use the longterm follow-up guidelines to create an individualized care plan. This article will review the late adverse effects of childhood cancer therapy and the transition of patients from pediatric oncologists to physicians in adulthood, and explain how primary care physicians can use these tools to provide appropriate care to adult survivors of childhood cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1250-1255
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Family Physician
Volume81
Issue number10
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Survivors
Primary Health Care
Neoplasms
Primary Care Physicians
Guidelines
Patient Transfer
Therapeutics
Growth and Development
Pediatrics
Morbidity
Physicians
Recurrence
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Primary care of adult survivors of childhood cancer. / Seehusen, Dean; Baird, Drew; Bode, David.

In: American Family Physician, Vol. 81, No. 10, 01.01.2010, p. 1250-1255.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Seehusen, D, Baird, D & Bode, D 2010, 'Primary care of adult survivors of childhood cancer', American Family Physician, vol. 81, no. 10, pp. 1250-1255.
Seehusen, Dean ; Baird, Drew ; Bode, David. / Primary care of adult survivors of childhood cancer. In: American Family Physician. 2010 ; Vol. 81, No. 10. pp. 1250-1255.
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