Principal components of heritability from neurocognitive domains differ between families with schizophrenia and control subjects

Howard Wiener, Lambertus Klei, Monica Calkins, Joel Wood, Vishwajit Nimgaonkar, Ruben Gur, L. DiAnne Bradford, Jan Richard, Neil Edwards, Robert Savage, Joseph Kwentus, Trina Allen, Joseph Patrick McEvoy, Alberto Santos, Raquel Gur, Bernie Devlin, Rodney Go

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Various measures of neurocognitive function show mean differences among individuals with schizophrenia (SZ), their relatives, and population controls. We use eigenvector transformations that maximize heritability of multiple neurocognitive measures, namely principal components of heritability (PCH), and evaluate how they distribute in SZ families and controls. Methods: African-Americans with SZ or schizoaffective disorder (SZA) (n = 514), their relatives (n = 1092), and adult controls (n = 300) completed diagnostic interviews and computerized neurocognitive tests. PCH were estimated from 9 neurocognitive domains. Three PCH, PCH1-PCH3, were modeled to determine if status (SZ, relative, and control), other psychiatric covariates, and education were significant predictors of mean values. A small-scale linkage analysis was also conducted in a subset of the sample. Results: PCH1, PCH2, and PCH3 account for 72% of the genetic variance. PCH1 represents 8 of 9 neurocognitive domains, is most highly correlated with spatial processing and emotion recognition, and has unadjusted heritability of 68%. The means for PCH1 differ significantly among SZ, their relatives, and controls. PCH2, orthogonal to PCH1, is most closely correlated with working memory and has an unadjusted heritability of 45%. Mean PCH2 is different only between SZ families and controls. PCH3 apparently represents a heritable component of neurocognition similar across the 3 diagnostic groups. No significant linkage evidence to PCH1-PCH3 or individual neurocognitive measures was discovered. Conclusions: PCH1 is highly heritable and genetically correlated with SZ. It should prove useful in future genetic analyses. Mean PCH2 differentiates SZ families and controls but not SZ and unaffected family members.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)464-471
Number of pages8
JournalSchizophrenia Bulletin
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2013

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Schizophrenia
Population Control
Short-Term Memory
Individuality
African Americans
Psychotic Disorders
Psychiatry
Emotions
Interviews
Education

Keywords

  • cognition
  • heritability
  • linkage
  • principal components
  • schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Principal components of heritability from neurocognitive domains differ between families with schizophrenia and control subjects. / Wiener, Howard; Klei, Lambertus; Calkins, Monica; Wood, Joel; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; Gur, Ruben; DiAnne Bradford, L.; Richard, Jan; Edwards, Neil; Savage, Robert; Kwentus, Joseph; Allen, Trina; McEvoy, Joseph Patrick; Santos, Alberto; Gur, Raquel; Devlin, Bernie; Go, Rodney.

In: Schizophrenia Bulletin, Vol. 39, No. 2, 01.03.2013, p. 464-471.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wiener, H, Klei, L, Calkins, M, Wood, J, Nimgaonkar, V, Gur, R, DiAnne Bradford, L, Richard, J, Edwards, N, Savage, R, Kwentus, J, Allen, T, McEvoy, JP, Santos, A, Gur, R, Devlin, B & Go, R 2013, 'Principal components of heritability from neurocognitive domains differ between families with schizophrenia and control subjects', Schizophrenia Bulletin, vol. 39, no. 2, pp. 464-471. https://doi.org/10.1093/schbul/sbr161
Wiener, Howard ; Klei, Lambertus ; Calkins, Monica ; Wood, Joel ; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit ; Gur, Ruben ; DiAnne Bradford, L. ; Richard, Jan ; Edwards, Neil ; Savage, Robert ; Kwentus, Joseph ; Allen, Trina ; McEvoy, Joseph Patrick ; Santos, Alberto ; Gur, Raquel ; Devlin, Bernie ; Go, Rodney. / Principal components of heritability from neurocognitive domains differ between families with schizophrenia and control subjects. In: Schizophrenia Bulletin. 2013 ; Vol. 39, No. 2. pp. 464-471.
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abstract = "Objective: Various measures of neurocognitive function show mean differences among individuals with schizophrenia (SZ), their relatives, and population controls. We use eigenvector transformations that maximize heritability of multiple neurocognitive measures, namely principal components of heritability (PCH), and evaluate how they distribute in SZ families and controls. Methods: African-Americans with SZ or schizoaffective disorder (SZA) (n = 514), their relatives (n = 1092), and adult controls (n = 300) completed diagnostic interviews and computerized neurocognitive tests. PCH were estimated from 9 neurocognitive domains. Three PCH, PCH1-PCH3, were modeled to determine if status (SZ, relative, and control), other psychiatric covariates, and education were significant predictors of mean values. A small-scale linkage analysis was also conducted in a subset of the sample. Results: PCH1, PCH2, and PCH3 account for 72{\%} of the genetic variance. PCH1 represents 8 of 9 neurocognitive domains, is most highly correlated with spatial processing and emotion recognition, and has unadjusted heritability of 68{\%}. The means for PCH1 differ significantly among SZ, their relatives, and controls. PCH2, orthogonal to PCH1, is most closely correlated with working memory and has an unadjusted heritability of 45{\%}. Mean PCH2 is different only between SZ families and controls. PCH3 apparently represents a heritable component of neurocognition similar across the 3 diagnostic groups. No significant linkage evidence to PCH1-PCH3 or individual neurocognitive measures was discovered. Conclusions: PCH1 is highly heritable and genetically correlated with SZ. It should prove useful in future genetic analyses. Mean PCH2 differentiates SZ families and controls but not SZ and unaffected family members.",
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AU - Wood, Joel

AU - Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit

AU - Gur, Ruben

AU - DiAnne Bradford, L.

AU - Richard, Jan

AU - Edwards, Neil

AU - Savage, Robert

AU - Kwentus, Joseph

AU - Allen, Trina

AU - McEvoy, Joseph Patrick

AU - Santos, Alberto

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