Procedures in critical care: Dialysis and apheresis

Matthew J. Diamond, Harold M. Szerlip

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Acute renal injury in the intensive care unit (ICU) is associated with significant excess mortality. A rise in the serum creatinine of 0.3 mg/dl is associated with worse outcomes in critically ill patients.1,2 Using the consensus definition of acute renal injury, the so-called RIFLE criteria 3, 4 (Fig. 8-1), the odds ratio for death increases from approximately 2.5 in those patients classified as having renal Risk to 5 for renal Injury and finally to 10 for those with Failure.5 Even after adjusting for other comorbidities, renal injury in the ICU is an independent risk factor for death 6-8 and the need for acute dialytic therapy in the ICU is associated with 50-60% mortality. 9, 10

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationBedside Procedures for the Intensivist
PublisherSpringer
Pages183-204
Number of pages22
ISBN (Print)9780387798295
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

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Blood Component Removal
Critical Care
Intensive Care Units
Dialysis
Kidney
Acute Kidney Injury
Mortality
Wounds and Injuries
Critical Illness
Comorbidity
Creatinine
Odds Ratio
Serum
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Diamond, M. J., & Szerlip, H. M. (2010). Procedures in critical care: Dialysis and apheresis. In Bedside Procedures for the Intensivist (pp. 183-204). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-79830-1_8

Procedures in critical care : Dialysis and apheresis. / Diamond, Matthew J.; Szerlip, Harold M.

Bedside Procedures for the Intensivist. Springer, 2010. p. 183-204.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Diamond, MJ & Szerlip, HM 2010, Procedures in critical care: Dialysis and apheresis. in Bedside Procedures for the Intensivist. Springer, pp. 183-204. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-79830-1_8
Diamond MJ, Szerlip HM. Procedures in critical care: Dialysis and apheresis. In Bedside Procedures for the Intensivist. Springer. 2010. p. 183-204 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-79830-1_8
Diamond, Matthew J. ; Szerlip, Harold M. / Procedures in critical care : Dialysis and apheresis. Bedside Procedures for the Intensivist. Springer, 2010. pp. 183-204
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