Progressive increase in QTc duration with induced hypothermia-a potential marker for arrthymia risk

Stevin A. Dubin, J. Jason Sims, John R Vender, Allison W. Miller, Holly G. Jense, Michael R. Ujhelyi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Hypothermia for head trauma patients has been shown to produce favorable outcomes, however, the risks of arrhythmias are not well documented. We postulate that hypothermia may be proarrhythmic by slowing ion channel conductance, which could prolong repolarization. Prolonged repolarization, long QT syndrome, is a risk for polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and sudden cardiac death. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the effect of body temperature on QTc interval. Methods: Fifteen anesthetized swine were studied, 8 hypothermia animals and 7 control animals. Hypothermia was induced by circulating ice water through anterior and posterior surgical thermal blankets. QT was measured from ECG lead II at every degree drop in body temperature. QTc was calculated using Bazett's formula Results: The effect of incremental reduction in body temperature on RR and QTc intervals are in the figure. As body temperature cooled below 36

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCritical care medicine
Volume27
Issue number1 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Dec 1 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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    Dubin, S. A., Jason Sims, J., Vender, J. R., Miller, A. W., Jense, H. G., & Ujhelyi, M. R. (1999). Progressive increase in QTc duration with induced hypothermia-a potential marker for arrthymia risk. Critical care medicine, 27(1 SUPPL.).