Prolonged Controlled Hemorrhagic Shock in a Swine Model: Is There a Role for Mechanical Circulatory Assistance?

Branislav Radovancevic, Harald C. Eichstaedt, Dan Tamez, Vijaykumar Surendrakant Patel, Kazuhiro Eya, Laura K. Nolden, Denise Byler, David Cohen, O. H. Frazier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Outcomes of mechanical circulatory assistance during hemorrhagic shock were evaluated in a swine model. Pigs were bled to a mean arterial pressure of 35 mm Hg (group I, n = 3) or 40 mm Hg (group II, n = 5; group III, n = 5), maintained there for 30 minutes, and then resuscitated with fluids alone (groups I and II) or fluids plus mechanical circulatory assistance (group III). Mean blood loss was greater in group I than in groups II or III (1,037 ± 212 vs. 862 ± 387 ml vs. 681 ± 117 ml, respectively; I vs. III, p < 0.05) and survival was shorter (230 ± 25.5 min vs. 709 ± 251 min vs. 662 ± 428 min, respectively; I vs. II or III, p < 0.05). Cardiac arrhythmia caused death in most cases. Mean biochemical parameters increased progressively in all cases. Left anterior descending coronary artery flow stayed relatively constant in group II but increased in group III. Superior mesenteric artery flow returned to baseline in group II but increased in group III. Cardiac output was similar in groups II and III, but SGOT levels significantly differed (750 ± 135 U/L vs. 359 ± 157 U/L; p < 0.005). These results suggest that the swine model will be useful for studying ways to improve outcomes after prolonged hemorrhagic shock.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)721-726
Number of pages6
JournalASAIO Journal
Volume49
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2003

Fingerprint

Hemorrhagic Shock
Swine
Fluids
Aspartate Aminotransferases
Blood
Superior Mesenteric Artery
Cardiac Output
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Coronary Vessels
Arterial Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Prolonged Controlled Hemorrhagic Shock in a Swine Model : Is There a Role for Mechanical Circulatory Assistance? / Radovancevic, Branislav; Eichstaedt, Harald C.; Tamez, Dan; Patel, Vijaykumar Surendrakant; Eya, Kazuhiro; Nolden, Laura K.; Byler, Denise; Cohen, David; Frazier, O. H.

In: ASAIO Journal, Vol. 49, No. 6, 01.11.2003, p. 721-726.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Radovancevic, B, Eichstaedt, HC, Tamez, D, Patel, VS, Eya, K, Nolden, LK, Byler, D, Cohen, D & Frazier, OH 2003, 'Prolonged Controlled Hemorrhagic Shock in a Swine Model: Is There a Role for Mechanical Circulatory Assistance?', ASAIO Journal, vol. 49, no. 6, pp. 721-726. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.MAT.0000093966.23324.00
Radovancevic, Branislav ; Eichstaedt, Harald C. ; Tamez, Dan ; Patel, Vijaykumar Surendrakant ; Eya, Kazuhiro ; Nolden, Laura K. ; Byler, Denise ; Cohen, David ; Frazier, O. H. / Prolonged Controlled Hemorrhagic Shock in a Swine Model : Is There a Role for Mechanical Circulatory Assistance?. In: ASAIO Journal. 2003 ; Vol. 49, No. 6. pp. 721-726.
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