Promising Approaches From Behavioral Economics to Improve Patient Lung Cancer Screening Decisions

Andrew J. Barnes, Lauren Groskaufmanis, Norman B Thomson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lung cancer is a devastating disease, the deadliest form of cancer in the world and in the United States. As a consequence of CMS's determination to provide low-dose CT (LDCT) as a covered service for at-risk smokers, LDCT lung cancer screening is now a covered service for many at-risk patients that first requires counseling and shared clinical decision making, including discussions of the risks and benefits of LDCT screening. However, shared decision making fundamentally relies on the premise that with better information, patients will arrive at rational decisions that align with their preferences and values. Evidence from the field of behavioral economics offers many contrary viewpoints that take into account patient decision making biases and the role of the shared decision environment that can lead to flawed choices and that are particularly relevant to lung cancer screening and treatment. This article discusses some of the most relevant biases, and suggests incorporating such knowledge into screening and treatment guidelines and shared decision making best practices to increase the likelihood that such efforts will produce their desired objectives to improve survival and quality of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1566-1570
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American College of Radiology
Volume13
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

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Behavioral Economics
Decision Making
Lung Neoplasms
Lung
Early Detection of Cancer
Practice Guidelines
Counseling
Quality of Life
Guidelines
Survival
Therapeutics
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Behavioral economics
  • cancer screening
  • lung cancer
  • smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Promising Approaches From Behavioral Economics to Improve Patient Lung Cancer Screening Decisions. / Barnes, Andrew J.; Groskaufmanis, Lauren; Thomson, Norman B.

In: Journal of the American College of Radiology, Vol. 13, No. 12, 01.12.2016, p. 1566-1570.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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