Promoting Community Awareness of Lung Cancer Screening Among Disparate Populations: Results of the cancer-Community Awareness Access Research and Education Project

Lovoria B. Williams, Stephen W. Looney, Thomas Joshua, Amber McCall, Martha S. Tingen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is the no. 1 cause of cancer death in the United States. Racial/ethnic minority and medically underserved populations suffer higher mortality than whites. Early detection through uptake of low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) among screening-eligible adults may mitigate high mortality. However, nearly 5 years since the publication of the US Preventive Services Task Force lung cancer screening guideline, population awareness of LDCT is low, and only 4% of screening-eligible adults have undergone screening. OBJECTIVE: This project used an education intervention to change participants' knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about cancer risk factors and lung cancer and to connect eligible individuals to LDCT screening and tobacco cessation services. INTERVENTIONS/METHODS: Community-engaged strategies were used to deliver a 4-week educational program in 13 community sites. Trained community health workers delivered the intervention. The intervention was guided by the Health Belief Model. Data were collected by survey to 481 participants; 93% were African American, the majority was female (73.1%), mean age was 58.3 (SD, 10.9) years. RESULTS: There were knowledge increase regarding lung cancer screening (P = .001), a significant decrease in Perceived Severity and Perceived Barriers subscales (P = .001), and an overall increase in response to Perceived Benefits of lung cancer screening and Self-efficacy (P = .001). Fifty-four percent of tobacco users engaged in cessation; 38% of screening-eligible participants underwent LDCT screening. CONCLUSIONS: Community health workers are effective in increasing awareness of lung cancer screening and affecting behavior change among disparate populations. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Community health workers may have a clinical role in LDCT shared decision making.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-97
Number of pages9
JournalCancer Nursing
VolumePublish Ahead of Print
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 10 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Oncology(nursing)

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