Prostatitis unplugged? Prostatic massage revisited

J. C. Nickel, R. Alexander, R. Anderson, J. Krieger, T. Moon, Durwood Earnest Neal, A. Schaeffer, D. Shoskes

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Repetitive prostatic massage is not a new tool in the urologists' armatarium. Once the most popular therapeutic maneuver used to treat prostatitis, it was abandoned as primary therapy almost 3 decades ago. Based on experience reported outside North America and anecodotal experiences of some patients and their physicians, it may be making a comeback. Unfortunately, there are almost no prospective data that would substantiate a claim as to its effectiveness. This article discusses the historic aspects of prostatic massage, suggests possible mechanisms of action, and describes the opinions of North American urologists who are associated with academic clinical research centers and are universally acknowledged as experts in the diagnosis and treatment of prostatitis. At this time, the science of prostatic massage must rely on anecdotal experiences, small, uncontrolled studies, and perhaps somewhat biased opinions of the major thought leaders in the field of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalTechniques in Urology
Volume5
Issue number1
StatePublished - May 29 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Prostatitis
Massage
Pelvic Pain
North America
Chronic Pain
Therapeutics
Physicians
Research
Urologists

Keywords

  • Chronic pelvic pain syndrome
  • Chronic prostatitis
  • Prostate
  • Prostatic massage
  • Prostatitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Nickel, J. C., Alexander, R., Anderson, R., Krieger, J., Moon, T., Neal, D. E., ... Shoskes, D. (1999). Prostatitis unplugged? Prostatic massage revisited. Techniques in Urology, 5(1), 1-7.

Prostatitis unplugged? Prostatic massage revisited. / Nickel, J. C.; Alexander, R.; Anderson, R.; Krieger, J.; Moon, T.; Neal, Durwood Earnest; Schaeffer, A.; Shoskes, D.

In: Techniques in Urology, Vol. 5, No. 1, 29.05.1999, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Nickel, JC, Alexander, R, Anderson, R, Krieger, J, Moon, T, Neal, DE, Schaeffer, A & Shoskes, D 1999, 'Prostatitis unplugged? Prostatic massage revisited', Techniques in Urology, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 1-7.
Nickel JC, Alexander R, Anderson R, Krieger J, Moon T, Neal DE et al. Prostatitis unplugged? Prostatic massage revisited. Techniques in Urology. 1999 May 29;5(1):1-7.
Nickel, J. C. ; Alexander, R. ; Anderson, R. ; Krieger, J. ; Moon, T. ; Neal, Durwood Earnest ; Schaeffer, A. ; Shoskes, D. / Prostatitis unplugged? Prostatic massage revisited. In: Techniques in Urology. 1999 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 1-7.
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