Psychiatry and psychology in the writings of L. Ron Hubbard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Celebrity followers of the Church of Scientology have recently used their public forum to attack the modern practice of mental health. The practice of Scientology is rooted in the religious writings of its founder, L. Ron Hubbard. This paper will review the religious writings of L Ron Hubbard to understand Scientology's position on mental health. This paper reviews four of the major religious books written by L Ron Hubbard, in addition to a comprehensive overview of Scientology compiled by Scientology staff. Hubbard's theory of mind borrowed heavily from the earlier writings of Freud, until Hubbard's psychological theory extended to include a spiritual existence that goes beyond the material world. The goal of Hubbard's psychology and religion were to optimize the freedom of the individual, and he viewed psychiatry and psychology as inherently anti-spiritual and opposed to personal freedom and self-realization. Ultimately Hubbard presents a world view of potential nuclear world cataclysm, fueled by the geopolitical climate and mental health theories that dominated the mid 20th century. Hubbard's writings mirrored the times in which he lived. His views that mental health practices are inherently anti-religious, freedom-inhibiting, and brain damaging do not reflect the modern-day practices of mental health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)437-447
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Religion and Health
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007

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Psychiatry
Mental Health
Psychology
Religion and Psychology
Psychological Theory
Theory of Mind
Climate
Scientology
Brain
Religious Writings

Keywords

  • Dianetics
  • L. Ron Hubbard
  • Mental health
  • Psychiatry
  • Psychology
  • Scientology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Religious studies

Cite this

Psychiatry and psychology in the writings of L. Ron Hubbard. / McCall, William Vaughn.

In: Journal of Religion and Health, Vol. 46, No. 3, 01.09.2007, p. 437-447.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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