Psychological Adjustment of Sickle Cell Children and Their Siblings

Frank Treiber, P. Alex Mabe, Gerry Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the psychological adjustment of children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) and their healthy siblings during a noncrisis period. Thirteen SCA children (age range, 8 to 17) along with their healthy sibling, matched for sex and age, and maternal caretakers completed self-report measures assessing affective and behavioral difficulties. Healthy siblings, when compared with SCA children, were found to be at increased risk of psychological adjustment problems. Healthy siblings’ distress levels were positively associated with their SCA siblings’ reports of problems and maternal depression and anxiety. Possible sources of sibling distress along with treatment implications and future directions of research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)82-88
Number of pages7
JournalChildren's Health Care
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1987

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Siblings
Sickle Cell Anemia
Risk Adjustment
Maternal Age
Self Report
Emotional Adjustment
Anxiety
Mothers
Depression
Research
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

Psychological Adjustment of Sickle Cell Children and Their Siblings. / Treiber, Frank; Mabe, P. Alex; Wilson, Gerry.

In: Children's Health Care, Vol. 16, No. 2, 09.1987, p. 82-88.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Treiber, Frank ; Mabe, P. Alex ; Wilson, Gerry. / Psychological Adjustment of Sickle Cell Children and Their Siblings. In: Children's Health Care. 1987 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 82-88.
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