Psychological well-being in individuals living in the community with traumatic brain injury

Lisa Payne, Lenore Hawley, Jessica M. Ketchum, Angela Philippus, C. B. Eagye, Clare Morey, Don Gerber, Cynthia Harrison-Felix, E. Diener

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Well-being and quality of life issues remain a long-term problem for many individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Meaningful activity is key to developing life satisfaction and a sense of contribution to society, yet individuals with TBI are often unable to return to competitive employment. Objective: To describe the self-reported psychological well-being of a cohort of unemployed individuals living in the community at least 1 year post TBI with low life satisfaction. Methods: Seventy-four unemployed individuals with low life satisfaction at least 1 year post TBI were administered measures of psychological well-being and cognitive functioning. Results: This cohort of 74 participants demonstrated cognitive impairment and elevated levels of emotional distress. Significant bivariate relationships were noted among nearly all measures of well-being, and associations were in the directions as expected. Individuals reported low life satisfaction and well-being. Two newer measures of well-being correlated with established measures used with this population. Conclusions: Individuals with TBI living in the community who are not employed but who seek to be productive reported low life satisfaction and well-being. This study highlights the need for interventions aimed at increasing productivity and meaning in life for individuals with TBI, and a broader understanding of psychological health after TBI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalBrain Injury
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Apr 30 2018

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Psychology
Traumatic Brain Injury
Quality of Life
Health
Population

Keywords

  • productivity
  • psychological well-being
  • TBI

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Payne, L., Hawley, L., Ketchum, J. M., Philippus, A., Eagye, C. B., Morey, C., ... Diener, E. (Accepted/In press). Psychological well-being in individuals living in the community with traumatic brain injury. Brain Injury, 1-6. https://doi.org/10.1080/02699052.2018.1468573

Psychological well-being in individuals living in the community with traumatic brain injury. / Payne, Lisa; Hawley, Lenore; Ketchum, Jessica M.; Philippus, Angela; Eagye, C. B.; Morey, Clare; Gerber, Don; Harrison-Felix, Cynthia; Diener, E.

In: Brain Injury, 30.04.2018, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Payne, L, Hawley, L, Ketchum, JM, Philippus, A, Eagye, CB, Morey, C, Gerber, D, Harrison-Felix, C & Diener, E 2018, 'Psychological well-being in individuals living in the community with traumatic brain injury', Brain Injury, pp. 1-6. https://doi.org/10.1080/02699052.2018.1468573
Payne, Lisa ; Hawley, Lenore ; Ketchum, Jessica M. ; Philippus, Angela ; Eagye, C. B. ; Morey, Clare ; Gerber, Don ; Harrison-Felix, Cynthia ; Diener, E. / Psychological well-being in individuals living in the community with traumatic brain injury. In: Brain Injury. 2018 ; pp. 1-6.
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