Psychophysiologic treatment of vocal cord dysfunction

Jay Edward Earles, Burton Kerr, Michael Kellar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD) is an obstructive upper airway syndrome that frequently mimics asthma and for which there is no empirical treatment of choice. Objective: To describe two military service members experiencing VCD who were treated with psychophysiologic self-regulation training. Methods: Both cases were active-duty military members with VCD confirmed by laryngoscopy They each received biofeedback self-regulation training to decrease tension in the extrinsic laryngeal musculature. Results: Both patients responded to the treatment, denied the presence of dsypnea, and had resumed military physical training. Conclusions: Psychophysiologic self-regulation strategies both with and without concurrent speech therapy positively impacted VCD symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)669-671
Number of pages3
JournalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Volume90
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Vocal Cord Dysfunction
Speech Therapy
Laryngoscopy
Therapeutics
Asthma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Psychophysiologic treatment of vocal cord dysfunction. / Earles, Jay Edward; Kerr, Burton; Kellar, Michael.

In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Vol. 90, No. 6, 01.06.2003, p. 669-671.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Earles, Jay Edward ; Kerr, Burton ; Kellar, Michael. / Psychophysiologic treatment of vocal cord dysfunction. In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 2003 ; Vol. 90, No. 6. pp. 669-671.
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