Race as an outcome predictor after radical prostatectomy: Results from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database

Stephen J. Freedland, Christopher L. Amling, Frederick Dorey, Christopher J. Kane, Joseph C. Presti, Martha Kennedy Terris, William J. Aronson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

88 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. Whether race is an independent predictor of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence after RP is controversial. To compare racial differences in clinical and pathologic features and biochemical recurrence in men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP), we used a newly established multicenter database of patients from four equal-access healthcare centers in California, the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database. Methods. A retrospective survey of 1547 patients treated with RP at four different equal-access medical centers in California between 1988 and 2001 was undertaken. Race was categorized as white (n = 1014), black (n = 338), or nonwhite-nonblack (n = 195). Patients were analyzed for racial differences in preoperative variables (age at surgery, clinical stage, PSA, and biopsy Gleason score) and surgical variables (pathologic stage, surgical Gleason score, incidence of seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margins, capsular penetration, and pelvic lymph node involvement). Patients were followed up for PSA recurrence. Multivariate analysis was used to determine whether race was an independent predictor of biochemical failure. Results. Significant differences were found among the races in the preoperative factors of clinical stage, age, serum PSA, and biopsy Gleason score, although the absolute differences were small. No differences were found among the races in the pathologic features of the RP specimens, including Gleason score, pathologic stage, and incidence of positive surgical margins, capsular penetration, seminal vesicle invasion, or lymph node involvement. In both univariate and multivariate analyses, only serum PSA (P <0.001) and biopsy Gleason score (P <0.001) were significant independent predictors of time to biochemical recurrence. Conclusions. In a large multicenter cohort of patients from four equal-access medical care facilities in California, although racial differences were found in clinical stage, age, biopsy Gleason score, and serum PSA level at diagnosis, we found race was not an independent predictor of biochemical recurrence after RP. Race should not be used in models or nomograms predicting PSA failure after RP. The current study represents the largest series of black patients and the first large series of nonwhite-nonblack patients treated with RP reported to date. The Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database is a valuable resource for studying patients treated with RP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)670-674
Number of pages5
JournalUrology
Volume60
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2002

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Cancer Care Facilities
Prostatectomy
Prostate-Specific Antigen
Neoplasm Grading
Databases
Recurrence
Biopsy
Seminal Vesicles
Multivariate Analysis
Lymph Nodes
Serum
Nomograms
Incidence
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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Race as an outcome predictor after radical prostatectomy : Results from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database. / Freedland, Stephen J.; Amling, Christopher L.; Dorey, Frederick; Kane, Christopher J.; Presti, Joseph C.; Terris, Martha Kennedy; Aronson, William J.

In: Urology, Vol. 60, No. 4, 01.10.2002, p. 670-674.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Freedland, Stephen J. ; Amling, Christopher L. ; Dorey, Frederick ; Kane, Christopher J. ; Presti, Joseph C. ; Terris, Martha Kennedy ; Aronson, William J. / Race as an outcome predictor after radical prostatectomy : Results from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database. In: Urology. 2002 ; Vol. 60, No. 4. pp. 670-674.
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abstract = "Objectives. Whether race is an independent predictor of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence after RP is controversial. To compare racial differences in clinical and pathologic features and biochemical recurrence in men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP), we used a newly established multicenter database of patients from four equal-access healthcare centers in California, the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database. Methods. A retrospective survey of 1547 patients treated with RP at four different equal-access medical centers in California between 1988 and 2001 was undertaken. Race was categorized as white (n = 1014), black (n = 338), or nonwhite-nonblack (n = 195). Patients were analyzed for racial differences in preoperative variables (age at surgery, clinical stage, PSA, and biopsy Gleason score) and surgical variables (pathologic stage, surgical Gleason score, incidence of seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margins, capsular penetration, and pelvic lymph node involvement). Patients were followed up for PSA recurrence. Multivariate analysis was used to determine whether race was an independent predictor of biochemical failure. Results. Significant differences were found among the races in the preoperative factors of clinical stage, age, serum PSA, and biopsy Gleason score, although the absolute differences were small. No differences were found among the races in the pathologic features of the RP specimens, including Gleason score, pathologic stage, and incidence of positive surgical margins, capsular penetration, seminal vesicle invasion, or lymph node involvement. In both univariate and multivariate analyses, only serum PSA (P <0.001) and biopsy Gleason score (P <0.001) were significant independent predictors of time to biochemical recurrence. Conclusions. In a large multicenter cohort of patients from four equal-access medical care facilities in California, although racial differences were found in clinical stage, age, biopsy Gleason score, and serum PSA level at diagnosis, we found race was not an independent predictor of biochemical recurrence after RP. Race should not be used in models or nomograms predicting PSA failure after RP. The current study represents the largest series of black patients and the first large series of nonwhite-nonblack patients treated with RP reported to date. The Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database is a valuable resource for studying patients treated with RP.",
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T2 - Results from the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database

AU - Freedland, Stephen J.

AU - Amling, Christopher L.

AU - Dorey, Frederick

AU - Kane, Christopher J.

AU - Presti, Joseph C.

AU - Terris, Martha Kennedy

AU - Aronson, William J.

PY - 2002/10/1

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N2 - Objectives. Whether race is an independent predictor of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence after RP is controversial. To compare racial differences in clinical and pathologic features and biochemical recurrence in men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP), we used a newly established multicenter database of patients from four equal-access healthcare centers in California, the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database. Methods. A retrospective survey of 1547 patients treated with RP at four different equal-access medical centers in California between 1988 and 2001 was undertaken. Race was categorized as white (n = 1014), black (n = 338), or nonwhite-nonblack (n = 195). Patients were analyzed for racial differences in preoperative variables (age at surgery, clinical stage, PSA, and biopsy Gleason score) and surgical variables (pathologic stage, surgical Gleason score, incidence of seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margins, capsular penetration, and pelvic lymph node involvement). Patients were followed up for PSA recurrence. Multivariate analysis was used to determine whether race was an independent predictor of biochemical failure. Results. Significant differences were found among the races in the preoperative factors of clinical stage, age, serum PSA, and biopsy Gleason score, although the absolute differences were small. No differences were found among the races in the pathologic features of the RP specimens, including Gleason score, pathologic stage, and incidence of positive surgical margins, capsular penetration, seminal vesicle invasion, or lymph node involvement. In both univariate and multivariate analyses, only serum PSA (P <0.001) and biopsy Gleason score (P <0.001) were significant independent predictors of time to biochemical recurrence. Conclusions. In a large multicenter cohort of patients from four equal-access medical care facilities in California, although racial differences were found in clinical stage, age, biopsy Gleason score, and serum PSA level at diagnosis, we found race was not an independent predictor of biochemical recurrence after RP. Race should not be used in models or nomograms predicting PSA failure after RP. The current study represents the largest series of black patients and the first large series of nonwhite-nonblack patients treated with RP reported to date. The Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database is a valuable resource for studying patients treated with RP.

AB - Objectives. Whether race is an independent predictor of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) recurrence after RP is controversial. To compare racial differences in clinical and pathologic features and biochemical recurrence in men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP), we used a newly established multicenter database of patients from four equal-access healthcare centers in California, the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital (SEARCH) database. Methods. A retrospective survey of 1547 patients treated with RP at four different equal-access medical centers in California between 1988 and 2001 was undertaken. Race was categorized as white (n = 1014), black (n = 338), or nonwhite-nonblack (n = 195). Patients were analyzed for racial differences in preoperative variables (age at surgery, clinical stage, PSA, and biopsy Gleason score) and surgical variables (pathologic stage, surgical Gleason score, incidence of seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margins, capsular penetration, and pelvic lymph node involvement). Patients were followed up for PSA recurrence. Multivariate analysis was used to determine whether race was an independent predictor of biochemical failure. Results. Significant differences were found among the races in the preoperative factors of clinical stage, age, serum PSA, and biopsy Gleason score, although the absolute differences were small. No differences were found among the races in the pathologic features of the RP specimens, including Gleason score, pathologic stage, and incidence of positive surgical margins, capsular penetration, seminal vesicle invasion, or lymph node involvement. In both univariate and multivariate analyses, only serum PSA (P <0.001) and biopsy Gleason score (P <0.001) were significant independent predictors of time to biochemical recurrence. Conclusions. In a large multicenter cohort of patients from four equal-access medical care facilities in California, although racial differences were found in clinical stage, age, biopsy Gleason score, and serum PSA level at diagnosis, we found race was not an independent predictor of biochemical recurrence after RP. Race should not be used in models or nomograms predicting PSA failure after RP. The current study represents the largest series of black patients and the first large series of nonwhite-nonblack patients treated with RP reported to date. The Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database is a valuable resource for studying patients treated with RP.

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