Racial and ethnic differences in mammography use among U.S. women younger than age 40

Julie M. Kapp, A. Blythe Ryerson, Steven Scott Coughlin, Trevor D. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Evidence-based recommendations for routine breast cancer screening suggest that women begin mammography at age 40, although some women receive a mammogram before that age. Little is known about mammography use among younger women, especially with respect to race and ethnicity. Methods: We used data from the 2005 National Health Interview Survey to examine racial/ethnic differences in mammography use among U.S. women ages 30-39. We examined descriptive characteristics of women who reported ever having a mammogram, and used logistic regression to estimate associations between race/ethnicity and mammography use among women at average risk for breast cancer. Results: Our sample comprised 3,098 women (18% Hispanic, 13% non-Hispanic [NH] black, 69% NH white), of whom 29% reported having ever had a mammogram. NH black women were more likely than NH white women to report ever having a mammogram and receiving multiple mammograms before age 40 among women of average risk. Patterns of mammography use for Hispanic women compared to NH white women varied. Conclusion: Findings suggest differential utilization of mammograms by race/ethnicity among women outside current recommendations and of average risk. Future studies should examine the role of practice patterns and patient-provider communication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)327-337
Number of pages11
JournalBreast Cancer Research and Treatment
Volume113
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mammography
Hispanic Americans
Breast Neoplasms
Health Surveys
Early Detection of Cancer
Logistic Models
Communication
Interviews

Keywords

  • Breast neoplasms
  • Health services accessibility
  • Mammography
  • Mass screening
  • Practice guidelines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Racial and ethnic differences in mammography use among U.S. women younger than age 40. / Kapp, Julie M.; Ryerson, A. Blythe; Coughlin, Steven Scott; Thompson, Trevor D.

In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, Vol. 113, No. 2, 01.01.2009, p. 327-337.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kapp, Julie M. ; Ryerson, A. Blythe ; Coughlin, Steven Scott ; Thompson, Trevor D. / Racial and ethnic differences in mammography use among U.S. women younger than age 40. In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. 2009 ; Vol. 113, No. 2. pp. 327-337.
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