Racial disparities in the use of laparoscopic surgery to treat colonic diverticulitis are not fully explained by socioeconomics or disease complexity

Randi L. Lassiter, Asif Talukder, Meryl M. Abrams, Bao Ling Adam, Daniel Albo, Cassandra Q. White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Several studies have demonstrated favorable outcomes for laparoscopic surgery over open surgery for the treatment of diverticular disease. This study was designed to analyze the relationship between race, socioeconomic status and the use of laparoscopy to address diverticulitis. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 53,054 diverticulitis admissions was performed using data from the 2009-2013 National Inpatient Sample (NIS). The primary outcome was the use of laparoscopic versus open colectomy. Bivariate analysis and multivariable logistic regression were used to determine the raw and adjusted odds by race, insurance status, and median household income. Results: Overall, 41.6% of colectomies involved the use of laparoscopy. Black patients were 19% less likely than White patients to undergo laparoscopic surgery. Hispanic patients were no more or less likely to undergo laparoscopic colectomy. Lacking private insurance was a strong predictor of undergoing open surgery. Lower income patients were 33% less likely to receive minimally invasive colectomies. Conclusions: These results demonstrate disparities in surgical treatment. Further research is warranted to understand and ameliorate treatment differences which can contribute to outcome disparities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)673-677
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume213
Issue number4
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jul 9 2016

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Colonic Diverticulitis
Colectomy
Laparoscopy
Diverticulitis
Insurance Coverage
Insurance
Hispanic Americans
Social Class
Inpatients
Therapeutics
Logistic Models
Research

Keywords

  • Colectomy
  • Disparities
  • Diverticulitis
  • Laparoscopy
  • Minimally invasive surgery
  • Race
  • Socioeconomic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Racial disparities in the use of laparoscopic surgery to treat colonic diverticulitis are not fully explained by socioeconomics or disease complexity. / Lassiter, Randi L.; Talukder, Asif; Abrams, Meryl M.; Adam, Bao Ling; Albo, Daniel; White, Cassandra Q.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 213, No. 4, 09.07.2016, p. 673-677.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Albo, Daniel

AU - White, Cassandra Q.

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