RAGE and Aβ immunoglobulins: Relation to Alzheimers disease-related cognitive function

Meghan B. Mitchell, Jerry J. Buccafusco, Rosann F. Schade, Scott J. Webster, Shyamala Mruthinti, Dean U Harrell, Nidhi K Gulati, L. Stephen Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The immunoglobulins (IgGs) for beta amyloid (Aβ) and receptors for the advanced glycation end products (RAGE) have previously been shown to be related to memory and language measures in a mixed neurological sample of older adults. In this study, we examined group differences in Aβ and RAGE IgGs, as well as the relationship between both IgGs and cognitive performance in nondiabetic older adults with normal cognition, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and probable Alzheimers disease (AD). We found RAGE and Aβ levels to be elevated in some AD participants, leading to significant AD-control group differences. While there was an overall correlation between both IgG levels and global cognition across all three groups, this relationship was largely attributable to group differences in cognition, highlighted by considerable variability within groups in the relationship between IgG levels and cognition. While findings do not support a consistent relationship between cognition and either IgG, further research with larger samples is needed to better characterize cognitive differences between AD participants with high versus low Aβ and RAGE titers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)672-678
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the International Neuropsychological Society
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Fingerprint

Cognition
Immunoglobulins
Alzheimer Disease
Immunoglobulin G
Amyloid
Language
Advanced Glycosylation End Product-Specific Receptor
Control Groups
Research

Keywords

  • Biomarkers
  • Blood test
  • Dementia
  • Early detection
  • Immune system function
  • Memory function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

RAGE and Aβ immunoglobulins : Relation to Alzheimers disease-related cognitive function. / Mitchell, Meghan B.; Buccafusco, Jerry J.; Schade, Rosann F.; Webster, Scott J.; Mruthinti, Shyamala; Harrell, Dean U; Gulati, Nidhi K; Miller, L. Stephen.

In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, Vol. 16, No. 4, 01.01.2010, p. 672-678.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mitchell, Meghan B. ; Buccafusco, Jerry J. ; Schade, Rosann F. ; Webster, Scott J. ; Mruthinti, Shyamala ; Harrell, Dean U ; Gulati, Nidhi K ; Miller, L. Stephen. / RAGE and Aβ immunoglobulins : Relation to Alzheimers disease-related cognitive function. In: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society. 2010 ; Vol. 16, No. 4. pp. 672-678.
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