Randomized trial comparing vaccinia on the external surfaces of 3 conventional bandages applied to smallpox vaccination sites in primary vaccinees

Kirk H. Waibel, Edward P. Ager, Richard L. Topolski, Douglas S. Walsh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Concern about accidental contact transmission after smallpox vaccination has prompted various recommendations regarding vaccination site coverage. Methods. On days 6-8 after their first-ever smallpox vaccination, 63 adult subjects were randomized to apply a self-adhesive bandage (n = 20), gauze with adhesive tape (n = 21), or gauze with a semipermeable dressing (n = 22) over the vaccination site for a mean of 8 ± 2 h. Swabs from the external bandage surfaces and the vaccination sites were then assessed by real time vaccinia-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in blinded fashion. Results. Among 58 subjects completing the study, PCR results were positive for the vaccination site in 55 (94.8%) and on 10 swabs (17.2%) from external bandage surfaces. There were no differences among the 3 bandages (P = .57). Conclusions. At 7 days after smallpox vaccination, a peak time for vaccinia shedding, a self-adhesive bandage was as effective as 2 bulkier, less convenient bandages in limiting PCR-detectable virus on the external surface.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1004-1007
Number of pages4
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume39
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2004

Fingerprint

Vaccinia
Smallpox
Bandages
Vaccination
Adhesives
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Viruses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Randomized trial comparing vaccinia on the external surfaces of 3 conventional bandages applied to smallpox vaccination sites in primary vaccinees. / Waibel, Kirk H.; Ager, Edward P.; Topolski, Richard L.; Walsh, Douglas S.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 39, No. 7, 01.10.2004, p. 1004-1007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{96d76af1ad924e1c86e152ecdcc858a5,
title = "Randomized trial comparing vaccinia on the external surfaces of 3 conventional bandages applied to smallpox vaccination sites in primary vaccinees",
abstract = "Background. Concern about accidental contact transmission after smallpox vaccination has prompted various recommendations regarding vaccination site coverage. Methods. On days 6-8 after their first-ever smallpox vaccination, 63 adult subjects were randomized to apply a self-adhesive bandage (n = 20), gauze with adhesive tape (n = 21), or gauze with a semipermeable dressing (n = 22) over the vaccination site for a mean of 8 ± 2 h. Swabs from the external bandage surfaces and the vaccination sites were then assessed by real time vaccinia-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in blinded fashion. Results. Among 58 subjects completing the study, PCR results were positive for the vaccination site in 55 (94.8{\%}) and on 10 swabs (17.2{\%}) from external bandage surfaces. There were no differences among the 3 bandages (P = .57). Conclusions. At 7 days after smallpox vaccination, a peak time for vaccinia shedding, a self-adhesive bandage was as effective as 2 bulkier, less convenient bandages in limiting PCR-detectable virus on the external surface.",
author = "Waibel, {Kirk H.} and Ager, {Edward P.} and Topolski, {Richard L.} and Walsh, {Douglas S.}",
year = "2004",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1086/423967",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "39",
pages = "1004--1007",
journal = "Clinical Infectious Diseases",
issn = "1058-4838",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Randomized trial comparing vaccinia on the external surfaces of 3 conventional bandages applied to smallpox vaccination sites in primary vaccinees

AU - Waibel, Kirk H.

AU - Ager, Edward P.

AU - Topolski, Richard L.

AU - Walsh, Douglas S.

PY - 2004/10/1

Y1 - 2004/10/1

N2 - Background. Concern about accidental contact transmission after smallpox vaccination has prompted various recommendations regarding vaccination site coverage. Methods. On days 6-8 after their first-ever smallpox vaccination, 63 adult subjects were randomized to apply a self-adhesive bandage (n = 20), gauze with adhesive tape (n = 21), or gauze with a semipermeable dressing (n = 22) over the vaccination site for a mean of 8 ± 2 h. Swabs from the external bandage surfaces and the vaccination sites were then assessed by real time vaccinia-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in blinded fashion. Results. Among 58 subjects completing the study, PCR results were positive for the vaccination site in 55 (94.8%) and on 10 swabs (17.2%) from external bandage surfaces. There were no differences among the 3 bandages (P = .57). Conclusions. At 7 days after smallpox vaccination, a peak time for vaccinia shedding, a self-adhesive bandage was as effective as 2 bulkier, less convenient bandages in limiting PCR-detectable virus on the external surface.

AB - Background. Concern about accidental contact transmission after smallpox vaccination has prompted various recommendations regarding vaccination site coverage. Methods. On days 6-8 after their first-ever smallpox vaccination, 63 adult subjects were randomized to apply a self-adhesive bandage (n = 20), gauze with adhesive tape (n = 21), or gauze with a semipermeable dressing (n = 22) over the vaccination site for a mean of 8 ± 2 h. Swabs from the external bandage surfaces and the vaccination sites were then assessed by real time vaccinia-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in blinded fashion. Results. Among 58 subjects completing the study, PCR results were positive for the vaccination site in 55 (94.8%) and on 10 swabs (17.2%) from external bandage surfaces. There were no differences among the 3 bandages (P = .57). Conclusions. At 7 days after smallpox vaccination, a peak time for vaccinia shedding, a self-adhesive bandage was as effective as 2 bulkier, less convenient bandages in limiting PCR-detectable virus on the external surface.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=4744352079&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=4744352079&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1086/423967

DO - 10.1086/423967

M3 - Article

C2 - 15472853

AN - SCOPUS:4744352079

VL - 39

SP - 1004

EP - 1007

JO - Clinical Infectious Diseases

JF - Clinical Infectious Diseases

SN - 1058-4838

IS - 7

ER -