Realizing the value proposition: A longitudinal assessment of hospitals' Total Factor Productivity

Timothy R. Huerta, Eric W. Ford, William F. Ford, Mark A. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

U.S. hospitals are under continual pressure both to increase productivity and to improve quality through the use of Health Information Technology. This paper analyzes 3,187 US hospitals, using data reported to the American Hospital Association, to assess changes in productivity over a fiveyear period (2002-2006). The Malmquist Indices derived indicate that Total Factor Productivity (TFP) and Efficiency Change (EFFCH) both increased during that timeframe. The low Technological Change (TC) index indicates that improvements to organizational processes did not contribute substantially to productivity. A secondary analysis examined the use of Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) in relationship to the three indices. TFP trended positively for those hospitals further into the CPOE implementation process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)285-302
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Healthcare Engineering
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011

Fingerprint

Medical Order Entry Systems
Productivity
American Hospital Association
Medical Informatics
Pressure
Information technology
Health

Keywords

  • Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE)
  • Frontier analysis
  • Hospital productivity
  • Quality improvement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Surgery
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Realizing the value proposition : A longitudinal assessment of hospitals' Total Factor Productivity. / Huerta, Timothy R.; Ford, Eric W.; Ford, William F.; Thompson, Mark A.

In: Journal of Healthcare Engineering, Vol. 2, No. 3, 09.2011, p. 285-302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3799c55a5eb14391abf91ea927d7ed13,
title = "Realizing the value proposition: A longitudinal assessment of hospitals' Total Factor Productivity",
abstract = "U.S. hospitals are under continual pressure both to increase productivity and to improve quality through the use of Health Information Technology. This paper analyzes 3,187 US hospitals, using data reported to the American Hospital Association, to assess changes in productivity over a fiveyear period (2002-2006). The Malmquist Indices derived indicate that Total Factor Productivity (TFP) and Efficiency Change (EFFCH) both increased during that timeframe. The low Technological Change (TC) index indicates that improvements to organizational processes did not contribute substantially to productivity. A secondary analysis examined the use of Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) in relationship to the three indices. TFP trended positively for those hospitals further into the CPOE implementation process.",
keywords = "Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE), Frontier analysis, Hospital productivity, Quality improvement",
author = "Huerta, {Timothy R.} and Ford, {Eric W.} and Ford, {William F.} and Thompson, {Mark A.}",
year = "2011",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1260/2040-2295.2.3.285",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2",
pages = "285--302",
journal = "Journal of Healthcare Engineering",
issn = "2040-2295",
publisher = "Multi Science Publishing",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Realizing the value proposition

T2 - A longitudinal assessment of hospitals' Total Factor Productivity

AU - Huerta, Timothy R.

AU - Ford, Eric W.

AU - Ford, William F.

AU - Thompson, Mark A.

PY - 2011/9

Y1 - 2011/9

N2 - U.S. hospitals are under continual pressure both to increase productivity and to improve quality through the use of Health Information Technology. This paper analyzes 3,187 US hospitals, using data reported to the American Hospital Association, to assess changes in productivity over a fiveyear period (2002-2006). The Malmquist Indices derived indicate that Total Factor Productivity (TFP) and Efficiency Change (EFFCH) both increased during that timeframe. The low Technological Change (TC) index indicates that improvements to organizational processes did not contribute substantially to productivity. A secondary analysis examined the use of Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) in relationship to the three indices. TFP trended positively for those hospitals further into the CPOE implementation process.

AB - U.S. hospitals are under continual pressure both to increase productivity and to improve quality through the use of Health Information Technology. This paper analyzes 3,187 US hospitals, using data reported to the American Hospital Association, to assess changes in productivity over a fiveyear period (2002-2006). The Malmquist Indices derived indicate that Total Factor Productivity (TFP) and Efficiency Change (EFFCH) both increased during that timeframe. The low Technological Change (TC) index indicates that improvements to organizational processes did not contribute substantially to productivity. A secondary analysis examined the use of Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE) in relationship to the three indices. TFP trended positively for those hospitals further into the CPOE implementation process.

KW - Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE)

KW - Frontier analysis

KW - Hospital productivity

KW - Quality improvement

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84864097340&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84864097340&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1260/2040-2295.2.3.285

DO - 10.1260/2040-2295.2.3.285

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84864097340

VL - 2

SP - 285

EP - 302

JO - Journal of Healthcare Engineering

JF - Journal of Healthcare Engineering

SN - 2040-2295

IS - 3

ER -