Regulation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase through alternative transcripts

Jay E. Brenman, Houhui Xia, Daniel S. Chao, Steve M. Black, David S. Bredt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

130 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nitric oxide (NO) participates in diverse physiological processes ranging from neurotransmission to muscle relaxation. Neuronal-derived NO can be either beneficial or detrimental depending on the cellular context. Neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) must therefore be tightly regulated. One level of regulation involves synthesis of numerous nNOS mRNA transcripts. At least six distinct molecular species of nNOS mRNA are expressed in a tissue and developmentally-regulated manner. Alternative splicing allows the creation of nNOS proteins differing in both enzymatic characteristics and structural features. As one example, we find that there are nNOS mRNAs lacking exon 2. One isoform, nNOSβ, retains full enzymatic activity but lacks a major protein-protein interaction domain (PDZ domain) responsible for targeting nNOS to synaptic membranes. This alternative splicing produces a mislocalized but fully active protein which may be relevant to certain pathologies. As evidence of this, we find that many human brain tumors express an alternatively spliced form of nNOS that co-migrates with nNOSβ, and lacks exon 2. Finally, we also find a 2.5-kb testis-specific nNOS mRNA corresponding to the C-terminal reductase domain of nNOS whose function is unclear.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)224-231
Number of pages8
JournalDevelopmental Neuroscience
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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Nitric Oxide Synthase Type I
Nitric Oxide Synthase
Messenger RNA
Alternative Splicing
Exons
Nitric Oxide
Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs
Physiological Phenomena
PDZ Domains
Synaptic Membranes
Muscle Relaxation
Brain Neoplasms
Synaptic Transmission
Testis
Oxidoreductases
Protein Isoforms
Proteins
Pathology

Keywords

  • Dystrophin
  • Nitric oxide
  • PDZ domain
  • PSD-95

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Developmental Neuroscience

Cite this

Brenman, J. E., Xia, H., Chao, D. S., Black, S. M., & Bredt, D. S. (1997). Regulation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase through alternative transcripts. Developmental Neuroscience, 19(3), 224-231. https://doi.org/10.1159/000111211

Regulation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase through alternative transcripts. / Brenman, Jay E.; Xia, Houhui; Chao, Daniel S.; Black, Steve M.; Bredt, David S.

In: Developmental Neuroscience, Vol. 19, No. 3, 01.01.1997, p. 224-231.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brenman, JE, Xia, H, Chao, DS, Black, SM & Bredt, DS 1997, 'Regulation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase through alternative transcripts', Developmental Neuroscience, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 224-231. https://doi.org/10.1159/000111211
Brenman, Jay E. ; Xia, Houhui ; Chao, Daniel S. ; Black, Steve M. ; Bredt, David S. / Regulation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase through alternative transcripts. In: Developmental Neuroscience. 1997 ; Vol. 19, No. 3. pp. 224-231.
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