Regulation of the epithelial sodium channel by accessory proteins

Kelly Gormley, Yanbin Dong, Giuseppe A. Sagnella

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is of fundamental importance in the control of sodium fluxes in epithelial cells. Modulation of sodium reabsorption through the distal nephron ENaC is an important component in the overall control of sodium balance, blood volume and thereby of blood pressure. This is clearly demonstrated by rare genetic disorders of sodium-channel activity (Liddle's syndrome and pseudohypoaldosteronism type 1), associated with contrasting effects on blood pressure. The mineralocorticoid aldosterone is a well-established modulator of sodium-channel activity. Considerable insight has now been gained into the intracellular signalling pathways linking aldosterone-mediated changes in gene transcription with changes in ion transport. Activating pathways include aldosterone-induced proteins and especially the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase (SGK) and the small G-protein, K-Ras 2A. Targeting of the ENaC for endocytosis and degradation is now emerging as a major mechanism for the down-regulation of channel activity. Several proteins acting in concert are an intrinsic part of this process but Nedd4 (neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated 4) is of central importance. Other mechanisms known to interact with ENaC and affect sodium transport include channel-activating protease 1 (CAP-1), a membrane-anchored protein, and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator. The implications of research on accessory factors controlling ENaC activity are wide-ranging. Understanding cellular mechanisms controlling ENaC activity may provide a more detailed insight not only of ion-channel abnormalities in cystic fibrosis but also of the link between abnormal renal sodium transport and essential hypertension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-14
Number of pages14
JournalBiochemical Journal
Volume371
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2003

Fingerprint

Epithelial Sodium Channels
Accessories
Sodium
Aldosterone
Sodium Channels
Blood pressure
Proteins
Cystic Fibrosis
Liddle Syndrome
Pseudohypoaldosteronism
Blood Pressure
Mineralocorticoids
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Monomeric GTP-Binding Proteins
Nephrons
Ion Transport
Transcription
Endocytosis
Blood Volume
Ion Channels

Keywords

  • Aldosterone
  • Channel-activating protease
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Hypertension
  • Nedd4
  • Serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase (SGK)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Regulation of the epithelial sodium channel by accessory proteins. / Gormley, Kelly; Dong, Yanbin; Sagnella, Giuseppe A.

In: Biochemical Journal, Vol. 371, No. 1, 01.04.2003, p. 1-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Gormley, Kelly ; Dong, Yanbin ; Sagnella, Giuseppe A. / Regulation of the epithelial sodium channel by accessory proteins. In: Biochemical Journal. 2003 ; Vol. 371, No. 1. pp. 1-14.
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