Relating nickel-induced tissue inflammation to nickel release in vivo

John C. Wataha, Norris L. O'Dell, Baldev B. Singh, Mohamed Ghazi, Gary M. Whitford, Petra E. Lockwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

122 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nickel has a number of adverse biological effects that have made the use of nickel in biomedical implants controversial. Yet information about the distribution of nickel in tissues around nickel-containing implants is scarce. The purpose of the current study was to use a laser ablation technique, combined with inductively coupled mass spectroscopy, to assess the spatial distribution of nickel around nickel-containing implants in vivo. Polyethylene, pure nickel wire, or a nickel-containing alloy (Ni-Cr) were implanted subcutaneously into rats for 7 days. The tissues were analyzed for Ni content and inflammation at 1-mm intervals up to 5 mm away from the implants. The sham surgery sites and the polyethylene caused mild to moderate inflammation 1-2 mm from the implant site with no detectable nickel in the tissue. The nickel wire caused severe inflammation up to 5 mm away from the implant site with necrosis for 1 mm around the implant. Nickel concentrations reached 48 μg/g near the implants, falling exponentially to undetectable levels at 3-4 mm from the implants. The Ni-Cr wire caused inflammation equivalent to polyethylene, with less than 4 μg/g of nickel present in the tissue for 1-2 mm around the implants. The current study showed that the laser-ablation technique was well suited for the analysis of soft tissues for metal-ion content, and that the nickel distribution in tissues correlated well with overt tissue inflammation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)537-544
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biomedical Materials Research
Volume58
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 8 2001

Fingerprint

Nickel
Tissue
Inflammation
Polyethylene
Ablation Techniques
Polyethylenes
Laser Therapy
Wire
Laser ablation
Information Dissemination
Tissue Distribution
Surgery
Spatial distribution
Metal ions
Rats
Mass Spectrometry
Necrosis
Metals
Spectroscopy
Ions

Keywords

  • Implants
  • Laser ablation
  • Tissue, metal ions
  • Toxicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Relating nickel-induced tissue inflammation to nickel release in vivo. / Wataha, John C.; O'Dell, Norris L.; Singh, Baldev B.; Ghazi, Mohamed; Whitford, Gary M.; Lockwood, Petra E.

In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research, Vol. 58, No. 5, 08.10.2001, p. 537-544.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wataha, John C. ; O'Dell, Norris L. ; Singh, Baldev B. ; Ghazi, Mohamed ; Whitford, Gary M. ; Lockwood, Petra E. / Relating nickel-induced tissue inflammation to nickel release in vivo. In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. 2001 ; Vol. 58, No. 5. pp. 537-544.
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