Relationship between mesenteric abnormalities on computed tomography and malignancy: Clinical findings and outcomes of 359 patients

Zachary L. Smith, Humberto Sifuentes, Parakkal Deepak, David B. Ecanow, Eli D. Ehrenpreis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND:: Mesenteric abnormalities are detected on abdominal computed tomography (CT) performed for various indications. GOALS:: Determine the risk of malignancy on follow-up of patients with these abnormalities without a preexisting malignancy. STUDY:: Data were collected on all patients at NorthShore University HealthSystem with abdominal CT scan reports of mesenteric abnormalities labeled as "panniculitis" from January 2005 to April 2010. RESULTS:: Three hundred fifty-nine patients were identified, 81 (22.6%) had a known malignancy at the time of the index abdominal CT scan. Nineteen (6.8%) of the 278 had a new diagnosis of malignancy on evaluation of the findings of the index CT scan. Among the 240 (86.33%) that did not have a notation of the abnormality in their medical record, 11 (4.58%) developed a malignancy during the study period. Sixty-eight of the 248 (24.46%) without a known malignancy had diseases associated with mesenteric abnormalities. The presence of these were associated with a reduction in the likelihood that the abnormalities are associated with new or delayed diagnosis of a malignancy (odds ratio, 0.197; 95% confidence interval, 0.0045-0.8501; P=0.013). Progression of underlying malignancy was unlikely in those where the mesenteric abnormalities did not worsen in appearance on follow-up CT scans (odds ratio, 0.03268; 95% confidence interval, 0.0028-0.3761; P=0.0061). CONCLUSIONS:: In the presence of an underlying disease associated with these findings, the subsequent finding of a malignancy is less likely. In addition, neglect of these findings may result in delayed diagnosis of cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)409-414
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Volume47
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2013

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Tomography
Neoplasms
Delayed Diagnosis
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Panniculitis
Medical Records

Keywords

  • computed tomography
  • panniculitis
  • peritoneal/complications
  • peritoneal/epidemiology
  • peritoneal/radiography
  • x-ray

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Relationship between mesenteric abnormalities on computed tomography and malignancy : Clinical findings and outcomes of 359 patients. / Smith, Zachary L.; Sifuentes, Humberto; Deepak, Parakkal; Ecanow, David B.; Ehrenpreis, Eli D.

In: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, Vol. 47, No. 5, 01.05.2013, p. 409-414.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "BACKGROUND:: Mesenteric abnormalities are detected on abdominal computed tomography (CT) performed for various indications. GOALS:: Determine the risk of malignancy on follow-up of patients with these abnormalities without a preexisting malignancy. STUDY:: Data were collected on all patients at NorthShore University HealthSystem with abdominal CT scan reports of mesenteric abnormalities labeled as {"}panniculitis{"} from January 2005 to April 2010. RESULTS:: Three hundred fifty-nine patients were identified, 81 (22.6{\%}) had a known malignancy at the time of the index abdominal CT scan. Nineteen (6.8{\%}) of the 278 had a new diagnosis of malignancy on evaluation of the findings of the index CT scan. Among the 240 (86.33{\%}) that did not have a notation of the abnormality in their medical record, 11 (4.58{\%}) developed a malignancy during the study period. Sixty-eight of the 248 (24.46{\%}) without a known malignancy had diseases associated with mesenteric abnormalities. The presence of these were associated with a reduction in the likelihood that the abnormalities are associated with new or delayed diagnosis of a malignancy (odds ratio, 0.197; 95{\%} confidence interval, 0.0045-0.8501; P=0.013). Progression of underlying malignancy was unlikely in those where the mesenteric abnormalities did not worsen in appearance on follow-up CT scans (odds ratio, 0.03268; 95{\%} confidence interval, 0.0028-0.3761; P=0.0061). CONCLUSIONS:: In the presence of an underlying disease associated with these findings, the subsequent finding of a malignancy is less likely. In addition, neglect of these findings may result in delayed diagnosis of cancer.",
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T2 - Clinical findings and outcomes of 359 patients

AU - Smith, Zachary L.

AU - Sifuentes, Humberto

AU - Deepak, Parakkal

AU - Ecanow, David B.

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N2 - BACKGROUND:: Mesenteric abnormalities are detected on abdominal computed tomography (CT) performed for various indications. GOALS:: Determine the risk of malignancy on follow-up of patients with these abnormalities without a preexisting malignancy. STUDY:: Data were collected on all patients at NorthShore University HealthSystem with abdominal CT scan reports of mesenteric abnormalities labeled as "panniculitis" from January 2005 to April 2010. RESULTS:: Three hundred fifty-nine patients were identified, 81 (22.6%) had a known malignancy at the time of the index abdominal CT scan. Nineteen (6.8%) of the 278 had a new diagnosis of malignancy on evaluation of the findings of the index CT scan. Among the 240 (86.33%) that did not have a notation of the abnormality in their medical record, 11 (4.58%) developed a malignancy during the study period. Sixty-eight of the 248 (24.46%) without a known malignancy had diseases associated with mesenteric abnormalities. The presence of these were associated with a reduction in the likelihood that the abnormalities are associated with new or delayed diagnosis of a malignancy (odds ratio, 0.197; 95% confidence interval, 0.0045-0.8501; P=0.013). Progression of underlying malignancy was unlikely in those where the mesenteric abnormalities did not worsen in appearance on follow-up CT scans (odds ratio, 0.03268; 95% confidence interval, 0.0028-0.3761; P=0.0061). CONCLUSIONS:: In the presence of an underlying disease associated with these findings, the subsequent finding of a malignancy is less likely. In addition, neglect of these findings may result in delayed diagnosis of cancer.

AB - BACKGROUND:: Mesenteric abnormalities are detected on abdominal computed tomography (CT) performed for various indications. GOALS:: Determine the risk of malignancy on follow-up of patients with these abnormalities without a preexisting malignancy. STUDY:: Data were collected on all patients at NorthShore University HealthSystem with abdominal CT scan reports of mesenteric abnormalities labeled as "panniculitis" from January 2005 to April 2010. RESULTS:: Three hundred fifty-nine patients were identified, 81 (22.6%) had a known malignancy at the time of the index abdominal CT scan. Nineteen (6.8%) of the 278 had a new diagnosis of malignancy on evaluation of the findings of the index CT scan. Among the 240 (86.33%) that did not have a notation of the abnormality in their medical record, 11 (4.58%) developed a malignancy during the study period. Sixty-eight of the 248 (24.46%) without a known malignancy had diseases associated with mesenteric abnormalities. The presence of these were associated with a reduction in the likelihood that the abnormalities are associated with new or delayed diagnosis of a malignancy (odds ratio, 0.197; 95% confidence interval, 0.0045-0.8501; P=0.013). Progression of underlying malignancy was unlikely in those where the mesenteric abnormalities did not worsen in appearance on follow-up CT scans (odds ratio, 0.03268; 95% confidence interval, 0.0028-0.3761; P=0.0061). CONCLUSIONS:: In the presence of an underlying disease associated with these findings, the subsequent finding of a malignancy is less likely. In addition, neglect of these findings may result in delayed diagnosis of cancer.

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