Relationship of Antibodies to Sperm Head to Etiology of Infertility in Patients Undergoing In Vitro Fertilization/Embryo Transfer

STACEY LEE MANDELBAUM, Michael Peter Diamond, ALAN H. DECHERNEY

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Antibodies to sperm head (ASA‐H) are believed to impair reproduction, probably because of a reduction in fertilization of human oocytes. However, the incidence of ASA‐H in couples with different etiologies of infertility undergoing in vitro fertilization/embryo transfer (IVF/ET) is unestablished. To examine this question, the semen, serum, and follicular fluid of 11 couples with unexplained infertility and 25 couples with tubal infertility undergoing IVF/ET were tested with the immunobead binding assay to identify ASA‐H of IgA, IgG, and IgM isotypes. Comparing couples with unexplained vs. tubal infertility, 46% vs. 4% had ASA‐H of at least one isotype in female serum (P = .006), 36% vs. 4% had ASA‐H in follicular fluid (P = .023), 27% vs. 0% had ASA‐H in semen (P = .023), and 18% vs. 4% had ASA‐H in male serum (P = .022), respectively. ASA‐H were present in one or more fluids tested in 55% of patients with unexplained infertility, compared to 8% of patients with tubal infertility (P = .005). Of the six women with ASA‐H in their serum, 83% (5/6) were undergoing IVF/ET for unexplained infertility compared to 17% (1/6: P = .08) undergoing IVF/ET for tubal infertility. In summary, clinically significant ASA‐H are present in a substantial number of infertile women undergoing IVF/ET, particularly those whose infertility is unexplained. Based on these findings, we conclude that it is efficacious to screen all women with unexplained infertility undergoing IVF/ET for ASA‐H. 1989 Munksgaard

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-5
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Reproductive Immunology
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989

Fingerprint

Sperm Head
Embryo Transfer
Fertilization in Vitro
Infertility
Antibodies
Follicular Fluid
Semen
Serum
Fertilization
Immunoglobulin A
Oocytes
Reproduction
Immunoglobulin M
Immunoglobulin G

Keywords

  • Antisperm antibodies
  • immunobead binding assay
  • in vitro fertilization‐embryo transfer
  • unexplained infertility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Relationship of Antibodies to Sperm Head to Etiology of Infertility in Patients Undergoing In Vitro Fertilization/Embryo Transfer. / MANDELBAUM, STACEY LEE; Diamond, Michael Peter; DECHERNEY, ALAN H.

In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, Vol. 19, No. 1, 01.01.1989, p. 3-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "ABSTRACT: Antibodies to sperm head (ASA‐H) are believed to impair reproduction, probably because of a reduction in fertilization of human oocytes. However, the incidence of ASA‐H in couples with different etiologies of infertility undergoing in vitro fertilization/embryo transfer (IVF/ET) is unestablished. To examine this question, the semen, serum, and follicular fluid of 11 couples with unexplained infertility and 25 couples with tubal infertility undergoing IVF/ET were tested with the immunobead binding assay to identify ASA‐H of IgA, IgG, and IgM isotypes. Comparing couples with unexplained vs. tubal infertility, 46{\%} vs. 4{\%} had ASA‐H of at least one isotype in female serum (P = .006), 36{\%} vs. 4{\%} had ASA‐H in follicular fluid (P = .023), 27{\%} vs. 0{\%} had ASA‐H in semen (P = .023), and 18{\%} vs. 4{\%} had ASA‐H in male serum (P = .022), respectively. ASA‐H were present in one or more fluids tested in 55{\%} of patients with unexplained infertility, compared to 8{\%} of patients with tubal infertility (P = .005). Of the six women with ASA‐H in their serum, 83{\%} (5/6) were undergoing IVF/ET for unexplained infertility compared to 17{\%} (1/6: P = .08) undergoing IVF/ET for tubal infertility. In summary, clinically significant ASA‐H are present in a substantial number of infertile women undergoing IVF/ET, particularly those whose infertility is unexplained. Based on these findings, we conclude that it is efficacious to screen all women with unexplained infertility undergoing IVF/ET for ASA‐H. 1989 Munksgaard",
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