Remember Tuskegee: Public health student knowledge of the ethical significance of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study

Steven Scott Coughlin, C. Metayer, G. D. Etheredge, Jr Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ethical problems that surrounded the Tuskegee Syphilis Study prompted widespread public criticism when they first surfaced in 1972; the Tuskegee Study remains an important case in bioethics. We recently examined public health student knowledge of the ethical significance of the Tuskegee Study as part of an ethics curriculum needs assessment at Tulane University. A brief questionnaire was administered to 236 graduate students currently enrolled in seven epidemiology courses. Basic demographic information was obtained along with information about degree program. A series of questions was then asked to assess student knowledge of bioethics including the ethical significance of the Tuskegee Study. Only 19% (46 of 236) of the students demonstrated knowledge of the ethical significance of the Tuskegee Study. Knowledge of the Tuskegee Study's ethical significance was higher among students who were from the United States and those who were enrolled in the epidemiology program (P < .05). The ethical problems that surrounded the Tuskegee Study have rarely been encountered in public health. However, this important case stands as an exemplar of the potential for ethical abuses in human subjects research. Such cases ought to be highlighted in public health curricula. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH): blacks, African Americans, educational curriculum, epidemiology, ethics, public health, racism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)242-246
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume12
Issue number4
StatePublished - Sep 25 1996

Fingerprint

Public Health Students
Syphilis
Curriculum
Students
Bioethics
Epidemiology
Public Health
Ethics
Medical Subject Headings
Racism
Needs Assessment
African Americans
Demography
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Remember Tuskegee : Public health student knowledge of the ethical significance of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study. / Coughlin, Steven Scott; Metayer, C.; Etheredge, G. D.; Martin, Jr.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 12, No. 4, 25.09.1996, p. 242-246.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{4855d834ca5343968d2e3bc121d97760,
title = "Remember Tuskegee: Public health student knowledge of the ethical significance of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study",
abstract = "The ethical problems that surrounded the Tuskegee Syphilis Study prompted widespread public criticism when they first surfaced in 1972; the Tuskegee Study remains an important case in bioethics. We recently examined public health student knowledge of the ethical significance of the Tuskegee Study as part of an ethics curriculum needs assessment at Tulane University. A brief questionnaire was administered to 236 graduate students currently enrolled in seven epidemiology courses. Basic demographic information was obtained along with information about degree program. A series of questions was then asked to assess student knowledge of bioethics including the ethical significance of the Tuskegee Study. Only 19{\%} (46 of 236) of the students demonstrated knowledge of the ethical significance of the Tuskegee Study. Knowledge of the Tuskegee Study's ethical significance was higher among students who were from the United States and those who were enrolled in the epidemiology program (P < .05). The ethical problems that surrounded the Tuskegee Study have rarely been encountered in public health. However, this important case stands as an exemplar of the potential for ethical abuses in human subjects research. Such cases ought to be highlighted in public health curricula. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH): blacks, African Americans, educational curriculum, epidemiology, ethics, public health, racism.",
author = "Coughlin, {Steven Scott} and C. Metayer and Etheredge, {G. D.} and Jr Martin",
year = "1996",
month = "9",
day = "25",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
pages = "242--246",
journal = "American Journal of Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0749-3797",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Remember Tuskegee

T2 - Public health student knowledge of the ethical significance of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study

AU - Coughlin, Steven Scott

AU - Metayer, C.

AU - Etheredge, G. D.

AU - Martin, Jr

PY - 1996/9/25

Y1 - 1996/9/25

N2 - The ethical problems that surrounded the Tuskegee Syphilis Study prompted widespread public criticism when they first surfaced in 1972; the Tuskegee Study remains an important case in bioethics. We recently examined public health student knowledge of the ethical significance of the Tuskegee Study as part of an ethics curriculum needs assessment at Tulane University. A brief questionnaire was administered to 236 graduate students currently enrolled in seven epidemiology courses. Basic demographic information was obtained along with information about degree program. A series of questions was then asked to assess student knowledge of bioethics including the ethical significance of the Tuskegee Study. Only 19% (46 of 236) of the students demonstrated knowledge of the ethical significance of the Tuskegee Study. Knowledge of the Tuskegee Study's ethical significance was higher among students who were from the United States and those who were enrolled in the epidemiology program (P < .05). The ethical problems that surrounded the Tuskegee Study have rarely been encountered in public health. However, this important case stands as an exemplar of the potential for ethical abuses in human subjects research. Such cases ought to be highlighted in public health curricula. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH): blacks, African Americans, educational curriculum, epidemiology, ethics, public health, racism.

AB - The ethical problems that surrounded the Tuskegee Syphilis Study prompted widespread public criticism when they first surfaced in 1972; the Tuskegee Study remains an important case in bioethics. We recently examined public health student knowledge of the ethical significance of the Tuskegee Study as part of an ethics curriculum needs assessment at Tulane University. A brief questionnaire was administered to 236 graduate students currently enrolled in seven epidemiology courses. Basic demographic information was obtained along with information about degree program. A series of questions was then asked to assess student knowledge of bioethics including the ethical significance of the Tuskegee Study. Only 19% (46 of 236) of the students demonstrated knowledge of the ethical significance of the Tuskegee Study. Knowledge of the Tuskegee Study's ethical significance was higher among students who were from the United States and those who were enrolled in the epidemiology program (P < .05). The ethical problems that surrounded the Tuskegee Study have rarely been encountered in public health. However, this important case stands as an exemplar of the potential for ethical abuses in human subjects research. Such cases ought to be highlighted in public health curricula. Medical Subject Headings (MeSH): blacks, African Americans, educational curriculum, epidemiology, ethics, public health, racism.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029809088&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029809088&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8874686

AN - SCOPUS:0029809088

VL - 12

SP - 242

EP - 246

JO - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

JF - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

SN - 0749-3797

IS - 4

ER -