Removal of intracardiac fractured port-a catheter utilizing an existing forearm peripheral intravenous access site in the cath lab

Pratik Choksy, Syed S. Zaidi, Deepak Kapoor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The intravenous port-A catheters are widely used for long-term central venous access in cancer patients. Spontaneous fracture and migration of implanted port catheters is a known complication and necessitates immediate removal. Percutaneous retrieval of intravascular foreign body has become a common practice and is commonly performed through central venous access, mostly using femoral, subclavian, or internal jugular veins. Although the percutaneous approach is relatively safe, it can lead to potential iatrogenic complications. We report the first case report of percutaneous removal of intravascular foreign body using forearm peripheral intravenous access.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75-76
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of Invasive Cardiology
Volume26
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Vascular Access Devices
Foreign Bodies
Forearm
Spontaneous Fractures
Jugular Veins
Thigh
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Foreign body removal
  • Port-a cath

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Removal of intracardiac fractured port-a catheter utilizing an existing forearm peripheral intravenous access site in the cath lab. / Choksy, Pratik; Zaidi, Syed S.; Kapoor, Deepak.

In: Journal of Invasive Cardiology, Vol. 26, No. 2, 01.01.2014, p. 75-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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