Renaissance of sickle cell disease research in the genome era

Research output: Book/ReportBook

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Human Genome Project has spawned a Renaissance of research faced with the daunting expectation of personalized medicine for individuals with sickle cell disease in the Genome Era. This book offers a comprehensive and timeless account of emerging concepts in clinical and basic science research, and community concerns of health disparity to educate professionals, students and the general public about meeting this challenging expectation. Contributions from physicians, research scientists, scientific administrators and community workers make Renaissance of Sickle Cell Disease Research in the Genome Era unique among the catalogue of books on this genetic disorder. Part 1 offers detailed review of the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute's leadership role in funding sickle cell research, as well as developing progressive research initiatives and the predicted impact of the Human Genome Project. Part 2 gives an account of several clinical research perspectives based on the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease. These include recommendations for newborn screening, pain management, stroke, transfusion therapy and pediatric and adult healthcare. Part 3 offers novel insights into basic science research progress and the impact of the Human Genome Project on the direction of hemoglobinopathy research, including hemoglobin switching, bone marrow transplantation and gene therapy. Part 4 engages the reader in a culture-based discussion of the stigma attached to sickle cell disease in the African American community and the apprehensions about genetic research in this community. It concludes with a global perspective on sickle cell disease from African, European and American experiences. For readers seeking a definitive account of sickle cell disease appropriate for students, researchers and community workers, this collaborative effort is an ideal textbook.

Original languageEnglish (US)
PublisherImperial College Press
Number of pages357
ISBN (Electronic)9781860947964
ISBN (Print)1860946453, 9781860946455
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sickle Cell Anemia
Genes
Genome
Research
Human Genome Project
African Americans
Students
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.)
Renaissance
Hemoglobinopathies
Genetic Research
Precision Medicine
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Textbooks
Gene therapy
Pediatrics
Pain Management
Administrative Personnel
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Genetic Therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Renaissance of sickle cell disease research in the genome era. / Pace, Betty Sue.

Imperial College Press, 2007. 357 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

@book{5d8bd1811cda408896f1e3e71f412d07,
title = "Renaissance of sickle cell disease research in the genome era",
abstract = "The Human Genome Project has spawned a Renaissance of research faced with the daunting expectation of personalized medicine for individuals with sickle cell disease in the Genome Era. This book offers a comprehensive and timeless account of emerging concepts in clinical and basic science research, and community concerns of health disparity to educate professionals, students and the general public about meeting this challenging expectation. Contributions from physicians, research scientists, scientific administrators and community workers make Renaissance of Sickle Cell Disease Research in the Genome Era unique among the catalogue of books on this genetic disorder. Part 1 offers detailed review of the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute's leadership role in funding sickle cell research, as well as developing progressive research initiatives and the predicted impact of the Human Genome Project. Part 2 gives an account of several clinical research perspectives based on the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease. These include recommendations for newborn screening, pain management, stroke, transfusion therapy and pediatric and adult healthcare. Part 3 offers novel insights into basic science research progress and the impact of the Human Genome Project on the direction of hemoglobinopathy research, including hemoglobin switching, bone marrow transplantation and gene therapy. Part 4 engages the reader in a culture-based discussion of the stigma attached to sickle cell disease in the African American community and the apprehensions about genetic research in this community. It concludes with a global perspective on sickle cell disease from African, European and American experiences. For readers seeking a definitive account of sickle cell disease appropriate for students, researchers and community workers, this collaborative effort is an ideal textbook.",
author = "Pace, {Betty Sue}",
year = "2007",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1142/P443",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "1860946453",
publisher = "Imperial College Press",

}

TY - BOOK

T1 - Renaissance of sickle cell disease research in the genome era

AU - Pace, Betty Sue

PY - 2007/1/1

Y1 - 2007/1/1

N2 - The Human Genome Project has spawned a Renaissance of research faced with the daunting expectation of personalized medicine for individuals with sickle cell disease in the Genome Era. This book offers a comprehensive and timeless account of emerging concepts in clinical and basic science research, and community concerns of health disparity to educate professionals, students and the general public about meeting this challenging expectation. Contributions from physicians, research scientists, scientific administrators and community workers make Renaissance of Sickle Cell Disease Research in the Genome Era unique among the catalogue of books on this genetic disorder. Part 1 offers detailed review of the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute's leadership role in funding sickle cell research, as well as developing progressive research initiatives and the predicted impact of the Human Genome Project. Part 2 gives an account of several clinical research perspectives based on the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease. These include recommendations for newborn screening, pain management, stroke, transfusion therapy and pediatric and adult healthcare. Part 3 offers novel insights into basic science research progress and the impact of the Human Genome Project on the direction of hemoglobinopathy research, including hemoglobin switching, bone marrow transplantation and gene therapy. Part 4 engages the reader in a culture-based discussion of the stigma attached to sickle cell disease in the African American community and the apprehensions about genetic research in this community. It concludes with a global perspective on sickle cell disease from African, European and American experiences. For readers seeking a definitive account of sickle cell disease appropriate for students, researchers and community workers, this collaborative effort is an ideal textbook.

AB - The Human Genome Project has spawned a Renaissance of research faced with the daunting expectation of personalized medicine for individuals with sickle cell disease in the Genome Era. This book offers a comprehensive and timeless account of emerging concepts in clinical and basic science research, and community concerns of health disparity to educate professionals, students and the general public about meeting this challenging expectation. Contributions from physicians, research scientists, scientific administrators and community workers make Renaissance of Sickle Cell Disease Research in the Genome Era unique among the catalogue of books on this genetic disorder. Part 1 offers detailed review of the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute's leadership role in funding sickle cell research, as well as developing progressive research initiatives and the predicted impact of the Human Genome Project. Part 2 gives an account of several clinical research perspectives based on the Cooperative Study of Sickle Cell Disease. These include recommendations for newborn screening, pain management, stroke, transfusion therapy and pediatric and adult healthcare. Part 3 offers novel insights into basic science research progress and the impact of the Human Genome Project on the direction of hemoglobinopathy research, including hemoglobin switching, bone marrow transplantation and gene therapy. Part 4 engages the reader in a culture-based discussion of the stigma attached to sickle cell disease in the African American community and the apprehensions about genetic research in this community. It concludes with a global perspective on sickle cell disease from African, European and American experiences. For readers seeking a definitive account of sickle cell disease appropriate for students, researchers and community workers, this collaborative effort is an ideal textbook.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84967373554&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84967373554&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1142/P443

DO - 10.1142/P443

M3 - Book

AN - SCOPUS:84967373554

SN - 1860946453

SN - 9781860946455

BT - Renaissance of sickle cell disease research in the genome era

PB - Imperial College Press

ER -