Renal oxygen delivery

Matching delivery to metabolic demand

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

71 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1. The kidneys are second only to the heart in terms of O2 consumption; however, relative to other organs, the kidneys receive a very high blood flow and oxygen extraction in the healthy kidney is low. Despite low arterial-venous O2 extraction, the kidneys are particularly susceptible to hypoxic injury and much interest surrounds the role of renal hypoxia in the development and progression of both acute and chronic renal disease. 2. Numerous regulatory mechanisms have been identified that act to maintain renal parenchymal oxygenation within homeostatic limits in the in vivo kidney. However, the processes by which many of these mechanisms act to modulate renal oxygenation and the factors that influence these processes remain poorly understood. 3. A number of such mechanisms specific to the kidney are reviewed herein, including the relationship between renal blood flow and O2 consumption, pre- and post-glomerular arterial-venous O2 shunting, tubulovascular cross-talk, the differential control of regional kidney blood flow and the tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism. 4. The roles of these mechanisms in the control of renal oxygenation, as well as how dysfunction of these mechanisms may lead to renal hypoxia, are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)961-967
Number of pages7
JournalClinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology
Volume33
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Oxygen
Kidney
Renal Circulation
Regional Blood Flow
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Kidney
  • Metabolism
  • Oxygen
  • Renal blood flow
  • Renal disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Pharmacology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Renal oxygen delivery : Matching delivery to metabolic demand. / O'Connor, Paul M.

In: Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology, Vol. 33, No. 10, 01.10.2006, p. 961-967.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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