Renal responses to hypertonic saline infusion in salt-sensitive spontaneously hypertensive rats

Mahmood S Mozaffari, Sanya Roysommuti, Zuohai H. Shao, J. Michael Wyss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and Sprague Dawley rats, high dietary sodium chloride (NaCl) increases natriuretic and diuretic responses to acute isotonic saline infusion, but in NaCl-sensitive spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR-S), a high-NaCl diet causes negligible increases in natriuretic and diuretic responses. To investigate whether this deficit in sodium and fluid excretion in SHR-S is stimulus (volume)-specific or because of a more generalized alteration in renal function, the present study measured, in SHR- S and Wistar Kyoto rats, natriuretic and diuretic responses to a hypertonic saline infusion (the Amount of sodium infused was equal to that infused in a previous, isotonic experiment). Eight-week-old Wistar Kyoto rats, SHR-S, and salt-resistant SHR were given a basal (1%) or high (8%)-NaCl diet for 2 weeks. Intravenous infusion of hypertonic saline increased mean arterial pressure and reduced heart rate in all groups. Baseline sodium excretion was lower in SHR-S compared with salt-resistant SHR with either diet, but after infusion of hypertonic saline, all 6 groups displayed significant increases in sodium and fluid excretion, glomerular filtration rate, and effective renal blood flow (ERBF). The percent-sodium excretion in response to hypertonic saline infusion was slightly, but significantly, lower in SHR-S (compared with salt-resistant SHR) for either the basal or the high-NaCl diet. We conclude that renal responses to hypertonic saline infusion are affected minimally in SHR-S compared with salt-resistant SHR or Wistar Kyoto rats. Therefore, the deficits in renal function observed in SHR-S after volume loading are not reflected in a renal deficit to hypertonic saline challenge.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)370-376
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of the Medical Sciences
Volume314
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

Fingerprint

Inbred SHR Rats
Salts
Kidney
Sodium
Inbred WKY Rats
Diuretics
Diet
Effective Renal Blood Flow
Dietary Sodium Chloride
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Intravenous Infusions
Sodium Chloride
Sprague Dawley Rats
Arterial Pressure
Heart Rate

Keywords

  • High salt
  • Hypertensive rat
  • Hypertonic saline
  • Natriuretic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Renal responses to hypertonic saline infusion in salt-sensitive spontaneously hypertensive rats. / Mozaffari, Mahmood S; Roysommuti, Sanya; Shao, Zuohai H.; Michael Wyss, J.

In: American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Vol. 314, No. 6, 01.01.1997, p. 370-376.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mozaffari, Mahmood S ; Roysommuti, Sanya ; Shao, Zuohai H. ; Michael Wyss, J. / Renal responses to hypertonic saline infusion in salt-sensitive spontaneously hypertensive rats. In: American Journal of the Medical Sciences. 1997 ; Vol. 314, No. 6. pp. 370-376.
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