Resetting of 'synaptic tags' is time- and activity-dependent in rat hippocampal CA1in vitro

S. Sajikumar, Julietta Uta Frey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have recently proposed that the maintenance of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression depends on at least two required processes: induction of LTP must set (1) process-specific 'synaptic tags' which capture (2) process-unspecific plasticity-related proteins (PRPs), synthesized via a heterosynaptic interaction [Neurobiol Learn Mem 82 (2004) 12]. The 'tag' as well as the PRPs are characterized by a relatively short half-life of several minutes up to a few hours before they degrade most likely by processes such as dephosphorylation. The question now arose whether the 'tags' can also be reset in an activity-dependent manner, thus preventing the processing of PRPs with the result of transient short-lasting plasticity. Here we have investigated this topic during early-LTP and found that low-frequency stimulation shortly after early-LTP-induction (5 min) resets the 'tag' or the 'tag complex' of macromolecules preventing any lasting forms of LTP and thus, preventing the formation of a memory trace.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)503-507
Number of pages5
JournalNeuroscience
Volume129
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2004

Fingerprint

Long-Term Potentiation
Proteins
Half-Life
Depression

Keywords

  • depotentiation
  • early-LTP
  • functional plasticity
  • late-LTP
  • long-term potentiation
  • synaptic tagging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Resetting of 'synaptic tags' is time- and activity-dependent in rat hippocampal CA1in vitro. / Sajikumar, S.; Frey, Julietta Uta.

In: Neuroscience, Vol. 129, No. 2, 01.11.2004, p. 503-507.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sajikumar, S. ; Frey, Julietta Uta. / Resetting of 'synaptic tags' is time- and activity-dependent in rat hippocampal CA1in vitro. In: Neuroscience. 2004 ; Vol. 129, No. 2. pp. 503-507.
@article{83bafcca9cc841c3878a9cd5e3f7092e,
title = "Resetting of 'synaptic tags' is time- and activity-dependent in rat hippocampal CA1in vitro",
abstract = "We have recently proposed that the maintenance of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression depends on at least two required processes: induction of LTP must set (1) process-specific 'synaptic tags' which capture (2) process-unspecific plasticity-related proteins (PRPs), synthesized via a heterosynaptic interaction [Neurobiol Learn Mem 82 (2004) 12]. The 'tag' as well as the PRPs are characterized by a relatively short half-life of several minutes up to a few hours before they degrade most likely by processes such as dephosphorylation. The question now arose whether the 'tags' can also be reset in an activity-dependent manner, thus preventing the processing of PRPs with the result of transient short-lasting plasticity. Here we have investigated this topic during early-LTP and found that low-frequency stimulation shortly after early-LTP-induction (5 min) resets the 'tag' or the 'tag complex' of macromolecules preventing any lasting forms of LTP and thus, preventing the formation of a memory trace.",
keywords = "depotentiation, early-LTP, functional plasticity, late-LTP, long-term potentiation, synaptic tagging",
author = "S. Sajikumar and Frey, {Julietta Uta}",
year = "2004",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.neuroscience.2004.08.014",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "129",
pages = "503--507",
journal = "Neuroscience",
issn = "0306-4522",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Resetting of 'synaptic tags' is time- and activity-dependent in rat hippocampal CA1in vitro

AU - Sajikumar, S.

AU - Frey, Julietta Uta

PY - 2004/11/1

Y1 - 2004/11/1

N2 - We have recently proposed that the maintenance of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression depends on at least two required processes: induction of LTP must set (1) process-specific 'synaptic tags' which capture (2) process-unspecific plasticity-related proteins (PRPs), synthesized via a heterosynaptic interaction [Neurobiol Learn Mem 82 (2004) 12]. The 'tag' as well as the PRPs are characterized by a relatively short half-life of several minutes up to a few hours before they degrade most likely by processes such as dephosphorylation. The question now arose whether the 'tags' can also be reset in an activity-dependent manner, thus preventing the processing of PRPs with the result of transient short-lasting plasticity. Here we have investigated this topic during early-LTP and found that low-frequency stimulation shortly after early-LTP-induction (5 min) resets the 'tag' or the 'tag complex' of macromolecules preventing any lasting forms of LTP and thus, preventing the formation of a memory trace.

AB - We have recently proposed that the maintenance of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression depends on at least two required processes: induction of LTP must set (1) process-specific 'synaptic tags' which capture (2) process-unspecific plasticity-related proteins (PRPs), synthesized via a heterosynaptic interaction [Neurobiol Learn Mem 82 (2004) 12]. The 'tag' as well as the PRPs are characterized by a relatively short half-life of several minutes up to a few hours before they degrade most likely by processes such as dephosphorylation. The question now arose whether the 'tags' can also be reset in an activity-dependent manner, thus preventing the processing of PRPs with the result of transient short-lasting plasticity. Here we have investigated this topic during early-LTP and found that low-frequency stimulation shortly after early-LTP-induction (5 min) resets the 'tag' or the 'tag complex' of macromolecules preventing any lasting forms of LTP and thus, preventing the formation of a memory trace.

KW - depotentiation

KW - early-LTP

KW - functional plasticity

KW - late-LTP

KW - long-term potentiation

KW - synaptic tagging

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=6344223400&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=6344223400&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2004.08.014

DO - 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2004.08.014

M3 - Article

C2 - 15501607

AN - SCOPUS:6344223400

VL - 129

SP - 503

EP - 507

JO - Neuroscience

JF - Neuroscience

SN - 0306-4522

IS - 2

ER -