Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin intravenous: Indications for use

N. A. Halsey, J. S. Abramson, P. J. Chesney, M. C. Fisher, M. A. Gerber, D. S. Gromisch, S. Kohl, S. M. Marcy, Dennis L Murray, G. D. Overturf, R. J. Whitley, R. Yogev, G. Peter, C. B. Hall, Jr Overall, R. Berkelman, W. A. Orenstein, R. Breiman, M. C. Hardegree, R. F. JacobsN. E. MacDonald, N. R. Rabinovich, W. Oh, L. R. Blackmon, A. A. Fanaroff, B. V. Kirkpatrick, H. M. MacDonald, C. A. Miller, A. Papile, C. T. Shoemaker, M. E. Speer, P. Johnson, Jr Greene, D. D. McMillan, D. Rowley, L. L. Wright, J. C. Langer

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

79 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin intravenous (RSV-IGIV) has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the prevention of severe RSV infections in infants and children younger than 24 months with bronchopulmonary dysplasia or a history of premature birth (≤35 weeks of gestation). RSV-IGIV administered monthly during the RSV season resulted in a 41% to 65% reduction in hospitalization rates in two clinical trials; however, RSV-IGIV is costly, and intravenous administration can be logistically demanding. RSV-IGIV should be considered for infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia who are receiving or have received oxygen therapy in the past 6 months. Infants with gestational ages of 32 weeks or less may also benefit clinically from RSV-IGIV prophylaxis. Immunization with measles- containing vaccines should be delayed for 9 months after the last dose of RSV-IGIV, but no changes need to be made for all other routinely administered vaccines. RSV-IGIV has not been approved for use in children with congenital heart disease, and available data indicate that RSV-IGIV should not be administered to children with cyanotic congenital heart disease because of safety concerns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)645-650
Number of pages6
JournalPediatrics
Volume99
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 1 1997

Fingerprint

Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia
Heart Diseases
Measles Vaccine
respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin intravenous
Premature Birth
United States Food and Drug Administration
Intravenous Administration
Gestational Age
Immunization
Hospitalization
Vaccines
Clinical Trials
Oxygen
Safety
Pregnancy
Infection
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Halsey, N. A., Abramson, J. S., Chesney, P. J., Fisher, M. C., Gerber, M. A., Gromisch, D. S., ... Langer, J. C. (1997). Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin intravenous: Indications for use. Pediatrics, 99(4), 645-650.

Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin intravenous : Indications for use. / Halsey, N. A.; Abramson, J. S.; Chesney, P. J.; Fisher, M. C.; Gerber, M. A.; Gromisch, D. S.; Kohl, S.; Marcy, S. M.; Murray, Dennis L; Overturf, G. D.; Whitley, R. J.; Yogev, R.; Peter, G.; Hall, C. B.; Overall, Jr; Berkelman, R.; Orenstein, W. A.; Breiman, R.; Hardegree, M. C.; Jacobs, R. F.; MacDonald, N. E.; Rabinovich, N. R.; Oh, W.; Blackmon, L. R.; Fanaroff, A. A.; Kirkpatrick, B. V.; MacDonald, H. M.; Miller, C. A.; Papile, A.; Shoemaker, C. T.; Speer, M. E.; Johnson, P.; Greene, Jr; McMillan, D. D.; Rowley, D.; Wright, L. L.; Langer, J. C.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 99, No. 4, 01.04.1997, p. 645-650.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Halsey, NA, Abramson, JS, Chesney, PJ, Fisher, MC, Gerber, MA, Gromisch, DS, Kohl, S, Marcy, SM, Murray, DL, Overturf, GD, Whitley, RJ, Yogev, R, Peter, G, Hall, CB, Overall, J, Berkelman, R, Orenstein, WA, Breiman, R, Hardegree, MC, Jacobs, RF, MacDonald, NE, Rabinovich, NR, Oh, W, Blackmon, LR, Fanaroff, AA, Kirkpatrick, BV, MacDonald, HM, Miller, CA, Papile, A, Shoemaker, CT, Speer, ME, Johnson, P, Greene, J, McMillan, DD, Rowley, D, Wright, LL & Langer, JC 1997, 'Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin intravenous: Indications for use', Pediatrics, vol. 99, no. 4, pp. 645-650.
Halsey NA, Abramson JS, Chesney PJ, Fisher MC, Gerber MA, Gromisch DS et al. Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin intravenous: Indications for use. Pediatrics. 1997 Apr 1;99(4):645-650.
Halsey, N. A. ; Abramson, J. S. ; Chesney, P. J. ; Fisher, M. C. ; Gerber, M. A. ; Gromisch, D. S. ; Kohl, S. ; Marcy, S. M. ; Murray, Dennis L ; Overturf, G. D. ; Whitley, R. J. ; Yogev, R. ; Peter, G. ; Hall, C. B. ; Overall, Jr ; Berkelman, R. ; Orenstein, W. A. ; Breiman, R. ; Hardegree, M. C. ; Jacobs, R. F. ; MacDonald, N. E. ; Rabinovich, N. R. ; Oh, W. ; Blackmon, L. R. ; Fanaroff, A. A. ; Kirkpatrick, B. V. ; MacDonald, H. M. ; Miller, C. A. ; Papile, A. ; Shoemaker, C. T. ; Speer, M. E. ; Johnson, P. ; Greene, Jr ; McMillan, D. D. ; Rowley, D. ; Wright, L. L. ; Langer, J. C. / Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin intravenous : Indications for use. In: Pediatrics. 1997 ; Vol. 99, No. 4. pp. 645-650.
@article{564ff585f8d04e79abd9d33bffe1307d,
title = "Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin intravenous: Indications for use",
abstract = "Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin intravenous (RSV-IGIV) has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the prevention of severe RSV infections in infants and children younger than 24 months with bronchopulmonary dysplasia or a history of premature birth (≤35 weeks of gestation). RSV-IGIV administered monthly during the RSV season resulted in a 41{\%} to 65{\%} reduction in hospitalization rates in two clinical trials; however, RSV-IGIV is costly, and intravenous administration can be logistically demanding. RSV-IGIV should be considered for infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia who are receiving or have received oxygen therapy in the past 6 months. Infants with gestational ages of 32 weeks or less may also benefit clinically from RSV-IGIV prophylaxis. Immunization with measles- containing vaccines should be delayed for 9 months after the last dose of RSV-IGIV, but no changes need to be made for all other routinely administered vaccines. RSV-IGIV has not been approved for use in children with congenital heart disease, and available data indicate that RSV-IGIV should not be administered to children with cyanotic congenital heart disease because of safety concerns.",
author = "Halsey, {N. A.} and Abramson, {J. S.} and Chesney, {P. J.} and Fisher, {M. C.} and Gerber, {M. A.} and Gromisch, {D. S.} and S. Kohl and Marcy, {S. M.} and Murray, {Dennis L} and Overturf, {G. D.} and Whitley, {R. J.} and R. Yogev and G. Peter and Hall, {C. B.} and Jr Overall and R. Berkelman and Orenstein, {W. A.} and R. Breiman and Hardegree, {M. C.} and Jacobs, {R. F.} and MacDonald, {N. E.} and Rabinovich, {N. R.} and W. Oh and Blackmon, {L. R.} and Fanaroff, {A. A.} and Kirkpatrick, {B. V.} and MacDonald, {H. M.} and Miller, {C. A.} and A. Papile and Shoemaker, {C. T.} and Speer, {M. E.} and P. Johnson and Jr Greene and McMillan, {D. D.} and D. Rowley and Wright, {L. L.} and Langer, {J. C.}",
year = "1997",
month = "4",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "99",
pages = "645--650",
journal = "Pediatrics",
issn = "0031-4005",
publisher = "American Academy of Pediatrics",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin intravenous

T2 - Indications for use

AU - Halsey, N. A.

AU - Abramson, J. S.

AU - Chesney, P. J.

AU - Fisher, M. C.

AU - Gerber, M. A.

AU - Gromisch, D. S.

AU - Kohl, S.

AU - Marcy, S. M.

AU - Murray, Dennis L

AU - Overturf, G. D.

AU - Whitley, R. J.

AU - Yogev, R.

AU - Peter, G.

AU - Hall, C. B.

AU - Overall, Jr

AU - Berkelman, R.

AU - Orenstein, W. A.

AU - Breiman, R.

AU - Hardegree, M. C.

AU - Jacobs, R. F.

AU - MacDonald, N. E.

AU - Rabinovich, N. R.

AU - Oh, W.

AU - Blackmon, L. R.

AU - Fanaroff, A. A.

AU - Kirkpatrick, B. V.

AU - MacDonald, H. M.

AU - Miller, C. A.

AU - Papile, A.

AU - Shoemaker, C. T.

AU - Speer, M. E.

AU - Johnson, P.

AU - Greene, Jr

AU - McMillan, D. D.

AU - Rowley, D.

AU - Wright, L. L.

AU - Langer, J. C.

PY - 1997/4/1

Y1 - 1997/4/1

N2 - Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin intravenous (RSV-IGIV) has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the prevention of severe RSV infections in infants and children younger than 24 months with bronchopulmonary dysplasia or a history of premature birth (≤35 weeks of gestation). RSV-IGIV administered monthly during the RSV season resulted in a 41% to 65% reduction in hospitalization rates in two clinical trials; however, RSV-IGIV is costly, and intravenous administration can be logistically demanding. RSV-IGIV should be considered for infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia who are receiving or have received oxygen therapy in the past 6 months. Infants with gestational ages of 32 weeks or less may also benefit clinically from RSV-IGIV prophylaxis. Immunization with measles- containing vaccines should be delayed for 9 months after the last dose of RSV-IGIV, but no changes need to be made for all other routinely administered vaccines. RSV-IGIV has not been approved for use in children with congenital heart disease, and available data indicate that RSV-IGIV should not be administered to children with cyanotic congenital heart disease because of safety concerns.

AB - Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin intravenous (RSV-IGIV) has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the prevention of severe RSV infections in infants and children younger than 24 months with bronchopulmonary dysplasia or a history of premature birth (≤35 weeks of gestation). RSV-IGIV administered monthly during the RSV season resulted in a 41% to 65% reduction in hospitalization rates in two clinical trials; however, RSV-IGIV is costly, and intravenous administration can be logistically demanding. RSV-IGIV should be considered for infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia who are receiving or have received oxygen therapy in the past 6 months. Infants with gestational ages of 32 weeks or less may also benefit clinically from RSV-IGIV prophylaxis. Immunization with measles- containing vaccines should be delayed for 9 months after the last dose of RSV-IGIV, but no changes need to be made for all other routinely administered vaccines. RSV-IGIV has not been approved for use in children with congenital heart disease, and available data indicate that RSV-IGIV should not be administered to children with cyanotic congenital heart disease because of safety concerns.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0009507060&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0009507060&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Review article

C2 - 9093323

AN - SCOPUS:0009507060

VL - 99

SP - 645

EP - 650

JO - Pediatrics

JF - Pediatrics

SN - 0031-4005

IS - 4

ER -