Risk factors associated with severity and location of intracranial arterial stenosis

Tanya N. Turan, Achraf A. Makki, Samuel Tsappidi, George Cotsonis, Michael J. Lynn, Harry J. Cloft, Marc I. Chimowitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Purpose-: We sought to determine the vascular risk factors and demographic features associated with the severity and location of intracranial stenosis. Methods-: Data on patients enrolled in the Warfarin-Aspirin Symptomatic Intracranial Disease (WASID) trial were used for the analyses. Demographic features and vascular risk factors were compared in patients with moderate stenosis (n=336) versus severe stenosis (n=225) and according to the location of intracranial stenosis (middle cerebral, internal carotid, basilar, or vertebral artery). Results-: History of a lipid disorder (77% in severe vs 67% in moderate, P=0.01), metabolic syndrome (63% in severe vs 53% in moderate, P=0.05), and diabetes (43% in severe vs 35% in moderate, P=0.04) were more common in patients with severe intracranial stenosis by univariate analyses. A history of a lipid disorder was independently associated with severe stenosis (odds ratio=1.62; 95% CI, 1.09 to 2.42; P=0.02). The distribution of stenosis location differed among age groups (P=0.0015), sexes (P=0.0001), races (P=0.0243), qualifying events (P=0.0156), diabetes (P=0.0030), coronary artery disease (P=0.0030), and hyperlipidemia (P=0.054). Patients with basilar artery stenoses were older and more likely to have hyperlipidemia. Patients with middle cerebral artery stenoses were more likely to be women and black. Patients with internal carotid artery stenoses were more likely to have diabetes. Patients with vertebral artery stenoses were more likely to have coronary artery disease. Conclusions-: History of a lipid disorder had the strongest association with severity of intracranial stenosis and should be the target of prevention therapies. Different locations of intracranial stenoses are associated with different vascular risk factors and demographic features, suggesting that there may be a difference in the underlying pathophysiology of stenoses among the intracranial arteries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1636-1640
Number of pages5
JournalStroke
Volume41
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2010

Fingerprint

Pathologic Constriction
Vertebrobasilar Insufficiency
Demography
Hyperlipidemias
Lipids
Coronary Artery Disease
Basilar Artery
Vertebral Artery
Carotid Stenosis
Middle Cerebral Artery
Internal Carotid Artery
Warfarin
Aspirin
Arteries
Age Groups
Odds Ratio

Keywords

  • cerebral arteries
  • cerebrovascular disease
  • intracranial stenosis
  • risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Turan, T. N., Makki, A. A., Tsappidi, S., Cotsonis, G., Lynn, M. J., Cloft, H. J., & Chimowitz, M. I. (2010). Risk factors associated with severity and location of intracranial arterial stenosis. Stroke, 41(8), 1636-1640. https://doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.110.584672

Risk factors associated with severity and location of intracranial arterial stenosis. / Turan, Tanya N.; Makki, Achraf A.; Tsappidi, Samuel; Cotsonis, George; Lynn, Michael J.; Cloft, Harry J.; Chimowitz, Marc I.

In: Stroke, Vol. 41, No. 8, 01.08.2010, p. 1636-1640.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Turan, TN, Makki, AA, Tsappidi, S, Cotsonis, G, Lynn, MJ, Cloft, HJ & Chimowitz, MI 2010, 'Risk factors associated with severity and location of intracranial arterial stenosis', Stroke, vol. 41, no. 8, pp. 1636-1640. https://doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.110.584672
Turan TN, Makki AA, Tsappidi S, Cotsonis G, Lynn MJ, Cloft HJ et al. Risk factors associated with severity and location of intracranial arterial stenosis. Stroke. 2010 Aug 1;41(8):1636-1640. https://doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.110.584672
Turan, Tanya N. ; Makki, Achraf A. ; Tsappidi, Samuel ; Cotsonis, George ; Lynn, Michael J. ; Cloft, Harry J. ; Chimowitz, Marc I. / Risk factors associated with severity and location of intracranial arterial stenosis. In: Stroke. 2010 ; Vol. 41, No. 8. pp. 1636-1640.
@article{8421a55451814441bd20299ff4fbc945,
title = "Risk factors associated with severity and location of intracranial arterial stenosis",
abstract = "Background and Purpose-: We sought to determine the vascular risk factors and demographic features associated with the severity and location of intracranial stenosis. Methods-: Data on patients enrolled in the Warfarin-Aspirin Symptomatic Intracranial Disease (WASID) trial were used for the analyses. Demographic features and vascular risk factors were compared in patients with moderate stenosis (n=336) versus severe stenosis (n=225) and according to the location of intracranial stenosis (middle cerebral, internal carotid, basilar, or vertebral artery). Results-: History of a lipid disorder (77{\%} in severe vs 67{\%} in moderate, P=0.01), metabolic syndrome (63{\%} in severe vs 53{\%} in moderate, P=0.05), and diabetes (43{\%} in severe vs 35{\%} in moderate, P=0.04) were more common in patients with severe intracranial stenosis by univariate analyses. A history of a lipid disorder was independently associated with severe stenosis (odds ratio=1.62; 95{\%} CI, 1.09 to 2.42; P=0.02). The distribution of stenosis location differed among age groups (P=0.0015), sexes (P=0.0001), races (P=0.0243), qualifying events (P=0.0156), diabetes (P=0.0030), coronary artery disease (P=0.0030), and hyperlipidemia (P=0.054). Patients with basilar artery stenoses were older and more likely to have hyperlipidemia. Patients with middle cerebral artery stenoses were more likely to be women and black. Patients with internal carotid artery stenoses were more likely to have diabetes. Patients with vertebral artery stenoses were more likely to have coronary artery disease. Conclusions-: History of a lipid disorder had the strongest association with severity of intracranial stenosis and should be the target of prevention therapies. Different locations of intracranial stenoses are associated with different vascular risk factors and demographic features, suggesting that there may be a difference in the underlying pathophysiology of stenoses among the intracranial arteries.",
keywords = "cerebral arteries, cerebrovascular disease, intracranial stenosis, risk factors",
author = "Turan, {Tanya N.} and Makki, {Achraf A.} and Samuel Tsappidi and George Cotsonis and Lynn, {Michael J.} and Cloft, {Harry J.} and Chimowitz, {Marc I.}",
year = "2010",
month = "8",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1161/STROKEAHA.110.584672",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "41",
pages = "1636--1640",
journal = "Stroke",
issn = "0039-2499",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Risk factors associated with severity and location of intracranial arterial stenosis

AU - Turan, Tanya N.

AU - Makki, Achraf A.

AU - Tsappidi, Samuel

AU - Cotsonis, George

AU - Lynn, Michael J.

AU - Cloft, Harry J.

AU - Chimowitz, Marc I.

PY - 2010/8/1

Y1 - 2010/8/1

N2 - Background and Purpose-: We sought to determine the vascular risk factors and demographic features associated with the severity and location of intracranial stenosis. Methods-: Data on patients enrolled in the Warfarin-Aspirin Symptomatic Intracranial Disease (WASID) trial were used for the analyses. Demographic features and vascular risk factors were compared in patients with moderate stenosis (n=336) versus severe stenosis (n=225) and according to the location of intracranial stenosis (middle cerebral, internal carotid, basilar, or vertebral artery). Results-: History of a lipid disorder (77% in severe vs 67% in moderate, P=0.01), metabolic syndrome (63% in severe vs 53% in moderate, P=0.05), and diabetes (43% in severe vs 35% in moderate, P=0.04) were more common in patients with severe intracranial stenosis by univariate analyses. A history of a lipid disorder was independently associated with severe stenosis (odds ratio=1.62; 95% CI, 1.09 to 2.42; P=0.02). The distribution of stenosis location differed among age groups (P=0.0015), sexes (P=0.0001), races (P=0.0243), qualifying events (P=0.0156), diabetes (P=0.0030), coronary artery disease (P=0.0030), and hyperlipidemia (P=0.054). Patients with basilar artery stenoses were older and more likely to have hyperlipidemia. Patients with middle cerebral artery stenoses were more likely to be women and black. Patients with internal carotid artery stenoses were more likely to have diabetes. Patients with vertebral artery stenoses were more likely to have coronary artery disease. Conclusions-: History of a lipid disorder had the strongest association with severity of intracranial stenosis and should be the target of prevention therapies. Different locations of intracranial stenoses are associated with different vascular risk factors and demographic features, suggesting that there may be a difference in the underlying pathophysiology of stenoses among the intracranial arteries.

AB - Background and Purpose-: We sought to determine the vascular risk factors and demographic features associated with the severity and location of intracranial stenosis. Methods-: Data on patients enrolled in the Warfarin-Aspirin Symptomatic Intracranial Disease (WASID) trial were used for the analyses. Demographic features and vascular risk factors were compared in patients with moderate stenosis (n=336) versus severe stenosis (n=225) and according to the location of intracranial stenosis (middle cerebral, internal carotid, basilar, or vertebral artery). Results-: History of a lipid disorder (77% in severe vs 67% in moderate, P=0.01), metabolic syndrome (63% in severe vs 53% in moderate, P=0.05), and diabetes (43% in severe vs 35% in moderate, P=0.04) were more common in patients with severe intracranial stenosis by univariate analyses. A history of a lipid disorder was independently associated with severe stenosis (odds ratio=1.62; 95% CI, 1.09 to 2.42; P=0.02). The distribution of stenosis location differed among age groups (P=0.0015), sexes (P=0.0001), races (P=0.0243), qualifying events (P=0.0156), diabetes (P=0.0030), coronary artery disease (P=0.0030), and hyperlipidemia (P=0.054). Patients with basilar artery stenoses were older and more likely to have hyperlipidemia. Patients with middle cerebral artery stenoses were more likely to be women and black. Patients with internal carotid artery stenoses were more likely to have diabetes. Patients with vertebral artery stenoses were more likely to have coronary artery disease. Conclusions-: History of a lipid disorder had the strongest association with severity of intracranial stenosis and should be the target of prevention therapies. Different locations of intracranial stenoses are associated with different vascular risk factors and demographic features, suggesting that there may be a difference in the underlying pathophysiology of stenoses among the intracranial arteries.

KW - cerebral arteries

KW - cerebrovascular disease

KW - intracranial stenosis

KW - risk factors

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77955172598&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77955172598&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1161/STROKEAHA.110.584672

DO - 10.1161/STROKEAHA.110.584672

M3 - Article

VL - 41

SP - 1636

EP - 1640

JO - Stroke

JF - Stroke

SN - 0039-2499

IS - 8

ER -