Risk factors for microalbuminuria in children with sickle cell anemia

Patricia Geraty McBurney, Coral Dawn Hanevold, Caterina Maria Hernandez, Jennifer L Waller, Kathleen Mood McKie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To determine the prevalence of microalbuminuria and to establish clinical characteristics associated with microalbuminuria in children with sickle cell anemia. Patients and Methods: Urine samples of all children (homozygous SS) followed in the Medical College of Georgia's Children's Medical Center Sickle Cell Clinic were screened for microalbuminuria. Random samples were obtained from continent patients at routine office visits between September 1996 and November 1999. A retrospective chart survey was performed to determine clinical correlates for microalbuminuria. Medical records were reviewed for age, sex, hemoglobin, and episodes of pneumonia, pain, aplasia, acute chest syndrome, priapism, and avascular necrosis. Demographic and clinical variables were compared with microalbuminuria by univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results: One hundred forty-two patients ages 21 months to 20 years made up the study group. The prevalence of microalbuminuria was 19%. Both increasing age and a lower hemoglobin level were found to correlate with microalbuminuria. By multivariate analysis, boys with microalbuminuria were likely to have a lower hemoglobin level and girls with microalbuminuria were likely to be older. None of the following factors were significantly related to microalbuminuria: pain, pneumonia, acute chest syndrome, pria-pism, avascular necrosis, or aplastic episodes. Conclusions: Microalbuminuria is strongly and directly related to age and strongly and inversely related to hemoglobin levels. Identification of risk factors for microalbuminuria may allow earlier intervention to prevent renal complications in patients with sickle cell disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)473-477
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology
Volume24
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2002

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Sickle Cell Anemia
Hemoglobins
Acute Chest Syndrome
Pneumonia
Necrosis
Priapism
Office Visits
Pain
Medical Records
Multivariate Analysis
Logistic Models
Demography
Urine
Kidney

Keywords

  • Hemoglobin
  • Microalbuminuria
  • Pediatrics
  • Sickle cell anemia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Oncology
  • Hematology

Cite this

Risk factors for microalbuminuria in children with sickle cell anemia. / McBurney, Patricia Geraty; Hanevold, Coral Dawn; Hernandez, Caterina Maria; Waller, Jennifer L; McKie, Kathleen Mood.

In: Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Vol. 24, No. 6, 01.08.2002, p. 473-477.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McBurney, Patricia Geraty ; Hanevold, Coral Dawn ; Hernandez, Caterina Maria ; Waller, Jennifer L ; McKie, Kathleen Mood. / Risk factors for microalbuminuria in children with sickle cell anemia. In: Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology. 2002 ; Vol. 24, No. 6. pp. 473-477.
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