Role of Ca2+ channels in short-term synaptic plasticity

Jianhua Xu, Liming He, Ling Gang Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Repetitive nerve activity induces various forms of short-term synaptic plasticity that have important computational roles in neuronal networks. Several forms of short-term plasticity are caused largely by changes in transmitter release, but the mechanisms that underlie these changes in the release process have been difficult to address. Recent studies of a giant synapse - the calyx of Held - have shed new light on this issue. Recordings of Ca2+ currents or Ca2+ concentrations at nerve terminals reveal that regulation of presynaptic Ca2+ channels has a significant role in three important forms of short-term plasticity: short-term depression, facilitation and post-tetanic potentiation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)352-359
Number of pages8
JournalCurrent Opinion in Neurobiology
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Neuronal Plasticity
Synapses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Role of Ca2+ channels in short-term synaptic plasticity. / Xu, Jianhua; He, Liming; Wu, Ling Gang.

In: Current Opinion in Neurobiology, Vol. 17, No. 3, 01.06.2007, p. 352-359.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Xu, Jianhua ; He, Liming ; Wu, Ling Gang. / Role of Ca2+ channels in short-term synaptic plasticity. In: Current Opinion in Neurobiology. 2007 ; Vol. 17, No. 3. pp. 352-359.
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