Role of cerebral lateralization in control of immune processes in humans

Kimford J. Meador, David W. Loring, Patty G. Ray, Sandra W. Helman, Blanca R. Vazquez, Pierre J. Neveu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cerebral lateralization may be important in neural control of immune function. Animal studies have demonstrated differential effects of left and right brain lesions on immune function, but human studies are inconclusive. Here, we show that resections in the language dominant hemisphere of patients with epilepsy reduce lymphocytes, total T cells, and helper T cells. In contrast, resections in the language nondominant hemisphere increased the same cellular elements. T-cell responses to mitogens and microbial antigens were not differentially affected. Left/right arm histamine skin response ratios were altered in patients with left cerebral epileptic focus, and flare skin responses were reduced by left cerebral resections in contrast with an increase after right cerebral resections. The findings demonstrate a differential role of the left and right cerebral hemispheres on immune functions in humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)840-844
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of Neurology
Volume55
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2004

Fingerprint

Cerebrum
Language
T-Lymphocytes
Skin
Helper-Inducer T-Lymphocytes
Mitogens
Histamine
Epilepsy
Lymphocytes
Antigens
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Meador, K. J., Loring, D. W., Ray, P. G., Helman, S. W., Vazquez, B. R., & Neveu, P. J. (2004). Role of cerebral lateralization in control of immune processes in humans. Annals of Neurology, 55(6), 840-844. https://doi.org/10.1002/ana.20105

Role of cerebral lateralization in control of immune processes in humans. / Meador, Kimford J.; Loring, David W.; Ray, Patty G.; Helman, Sandra W.; Vazquez, Blanca R.; Neveu, Pierre J.

In: Annals of Neurology, Vol. 55, No. 6, 01.06.2004, p. 840-844.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Meador, KJ, Loring, DW, Ray, PG, Helman, SW, Vazquez, BR & Neveu, PJ 2004, 'Role of cerebral lateralization in control of immune processes in humans', Annals of Neurology, vol. 55, no. 6, pp. 840-844. https://doi.org/10.1002/ana.20105
Meador KJ, Loring DW, Ray PG, Helman SW, Vazquez BR, Neveu PJ. Role of cerebral lateralization in control of immune processes in humans. Annals of Neurology. 2004 Jun 1;55(6):840-844. https://doi.org/10.1002/ana.20105
Meador, Kimford J. ; Loring, David W. ; Ray, Patty G. ; Helman, Sandra W. ; Vazquez, Blanca R. ; Neveu, Pierre J. / Role of cerebral lateralization in control of immune processes in humans. In: Annals of Neurology. 2004 ; Vol. 55, No. 6. pp. 840-844.
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