Role of primate visual area V4 in the processing of 3-D shape characteristics defined by disparity

Jay Hegde, David C. Van Essen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We studied the responses of V4 neurons in awake, fixating monkeys to a diverse set of stereoscopic stimuli, including zero-order disparity (frontoparallel) stimuli, surfaces oriented in depth, and convex and concave shapes presented at various mean disparities. The responses of many V4 cells were significantly modulated across each of these stimulus subsets. In general, V4 cells were broadly tuned for zero-order disparity, and at any given disparity value, about four-fifths of the cells responded significantly above background. The response modulation by flat surfaces oriented in depth was significant for about one-quarter of cells, and the responses of about one-third of the cells were significantly modulated by convex or concave surfaces at various mean disparities. However, we encountered no cells that unambiguously distinguished a given three-dimensional (3-D) shape independent of mean disparity. Thus 3-D shapes defined by disparity are unlikely to be represented explicitly at the level of individual V4 cells. Nonetheless, V4 cells likely play an important role in the processing of 3-D shape characteristics defined by disparity as a part of a distributed network.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2856-2866
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neurophysiology
Volume94
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Primates
Haplorhini
Neurons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Role of primate visual area V4 in the processing of 3-D shape characteristics defined by disparity. / Hegde, Jay; Van Essen, David C.

In: Journal of Neurophysiology, Vol. 94, No. 4, 01.10.2005, p. 2856-2866.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e9a3342967c6472dad0a1a61c7e8391e,
title = "Role of primate visual area V4 in the processing of 3-D shape characteristics defined by disparity",
abstract = "We studied the responses of V4 neurons in awake, fixating monkeys to a diverse set of stereoscopic stimuli, including zero-order disparity (frontoparallel) stimuli, surfaces oriented in depth, and convex and concave shapes presented at various mean disparities. The responses of many V4 cells were significantly modulated across each of these stimulus subsets. In general, V4 cells were broadly tuned for zero-order disparity, and at any given disparity value, about four-fifths of the cells responded significantly above background. The response modulation by flat surfaces oriented in depth was significant for about one-quarter of cells, and the responses of about one-third of the cells were significantly modulated by convex or concave surfaces at various mean disparities. However, we encountered no cells that unambiguously distinguished a given three-dimensional (3-D) shape independent of mean disparity. Thus 3-D shapes defined by disparity are unlikely to be represented explicitly at the level of individual V4 cells. Nonetheless, V4 cells likely play an important role in the processing of 3-D shape characteristics defined by disparity as a part of a distributed network.",
author = "Jay Hegde and {Van Essen}, {David C.}",
year = "2005",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1152/jn.00802.2004",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "94",
pages = "2856--2866",
journal = "Journal of Neurophysiology",
issn = "0022-3077",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Role of primate visual area V4 in the processing of 3-D shape characteristics defined by disparity

AU - Hegde, Jay

AU - Van Essen, David C.

PY - 2005/10/1

Y1 - 2005/10/1

N2 - We studied the responses of V4 neurons in awake, fixating monkeys to a diverse set of stereoscopic stimuli, including zero-order disparity (frontoparallel) stimuli, surfaces oriented in depth, and convex and concave shapes presented at various mean disparities. The responses of many V4 cells were significantly modulated across each of these stimulus subsets. In general, V4 cells were broadly tuned for zero-order disparity, and at any given disparity value, about four-fifths of the cells responded significantly above background. The response modulation by flat surfaces oriented in depth was significant for about one-quarter of cells, and the responses of about one-third of the cells were significantly modulated by convex or concave surfaces at various mean disparities. However, we encountered no cells that unambiguously distinguished a given three-dimensional (3-D) shape independent of mean disparity. Thus 3-D shapes defined by disparity are unlikely to be represented explicitly at the level of individual V4 cells. Nonetheless, V4 cells likely play an important role in the processing of 3-D shape characteristics defined by disparity as a part of a distributed network.

AB - We studied the responses of V4 neurons in awake, fixating monkeys to a diverse set of stereoscopic stimuli, including zero-order disparity (frontoparallel) stimuli, surfaces oriented in depth, and convex and concave shapes presented at various mean disparities. The responses of many V4 cells were significantly modulated across each of these stimulus subsets. In general, V4 cells were broadly tuned for zero-order disparity, and at any given disparity value, about four-fifths of the cells responded significantly above background. The response modulation by flat surfaces oriented in depth was significant for about one-quarter of cells, and the responses of about one-third of the cells were significantly modulated by convex or concave surfaces at various mean disparities. However, we encountered no cells that unambiguously distinguished a given three-dimensional (3-D) shape independent of mean disparity. Thus 3-D shapes defined by disparity are unlikely to be represented explicitly at the level of individual V4 cells. Nonetheless, V4 cells likely play an important role in the processing of 3-D shape characteristics defined by disparity as a part of a distributed network.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=24944566681&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=24944566681&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1152/jn.00802.2004

DO - 10.1152/jn.00802.2004

M3 - Article

VL - 94

SP - 2856

EP - 2866

JO - Journal of Neurophysiology

JF - Journal of Neurophysiology

SN - 0022-3077

IS - 4

ER -