School-aged follow-up of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) survivors

M. E. Gangarosa, C. Bunyapen, M. J. Cohen, W. P. Kanto, J. Bhatia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Prior results on 6 year old ECMO survivors showed that only those with neonatal seizures performed poorly on some measures of intelligence, language, and academic skills. This study included 23, 7-9 year old ECMO graduates. Similar measures of intellectual, language, and academic skills were used in conjunction with memory and sensory-motor measures. Moreover, Language, Visual-Spatial, Verbal Memory, and Visual Memory Standard Score Quotients were created by grouping subtests purported to measure these constructs. Groups were divided by neurological findings (15 abnormal; 8 normal). No significant differences were detected. However, those children with abnormal findings approached significance on the Language, Visual-Spatial, and Visual Memory Quotients, the Stanford-Binet (4th ed.) Composite, the Arithmetic subtest of the Wide Range Achievement Test-Rev., and Failure to Maintain Set on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. A case-by-case analysis performed with the GA State Special Education Regulations revealed that 50% with normal and 53% with abnormal findings fit the criteria for a Learning Disability (LD). Thus, despite infant neurological status, school-aged ECMO survivors are at a 3 fold risk of having a LD compared to normals (14%). Further studies are needed to determine whether hypoxia and/or ECMO (specifically) contributes to this risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)75A
JournalJournal of Investigative Medicine
Volume44
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

Fingerprint

Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Oxygenation
Survivors
Language
Visual languages
Membranes
Data storage equipment
Learning Disorders
Special Education
Intelligence
Sorting
Seizures
Education
Composite materials
Spatial Memory

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Gangarosa, M. E., Bunyapen, C., Cohen, M. J., Kanto, W. P., & Bhatia, J. (1996). School-aged follow-up of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) survivors. Journal of Investigative Medicine, 44(1), 75A.

School-aged follow-up of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) survivors. / Gangarosa, M. E.; Bunyapen, C.; Cohen, M. J.; Kanto, W. P.; Bhatia, J.

In: Journal of Investigative Medicine, Vol. 44, No. 1, 01.01.1996, p. 75A.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gangarosa, ME, Bunyapen, C, Cohen, MJ, Kanto, WP & Bhatia, J 1996, 'School-aged follow-up of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) survivors', Journal of Investigative Medicine, vol. 44, no. 1, pp. 75A.
Gangarosa, M. E. ; Bunyapen, C. ; Cohen, M. J. ; Kanto, W. P. ; Bhatia, J. / School-aged follow-up of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) survivors. In: Journal of Investigative Medicine. 1996 ; Vol. 44, No. 1. pp. 75A.
@article{1f340362c85c43d79b41ba68bf6ab1e1,
title = "School-aged follow-up of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) survivors",
abstract = "Prior results on 6 year old ECMO survivors showed that only those with neonatal seizures performed poorly on some measures of intelligence, language, and academic skills. This study included 23, 7-9 year old ECMO graduates. Similar measures of intellectual, language, and academic skills were used in conjunction with memory and sensory-motor measures. Moreover, Language, Visual-Spatial, Verbal Memory, and Visual Memory Standard Score Quotients were created by grouping subtests purported to measure these constructs. Groups were divided by neurological findings (15 abnormal; 8 normal). No significant differences were detected. However, those children with abnormal findings approached significance on the Language, Visual-Spatial, and Visual Memory Quotients, the Stanford-Binet (4th ed.) Composite, the Arithmetic subtest of the Wide Range Achievement Test-Rev., and Failure to Maintain Set on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. A case-by-case analysis performed with the GA State Special Education Regulations revealed that 50{\%} with normal and 53{\%} with abnormal findings fit the criteria for a Learning Disability (LD). Thus, despite infant neurological status, school-aged ECMO survivors are at a 3 fold risk of having a LD compared to normals (14{\%}). Further studies are needed to determine whether hypoxia and/or ECMO (specifically) contributes to this risk.",
author = "Gangarosa, {M. E.} and C. Bunyapen and Cohen, {M. J.} and Kanto, {W. P.} and J. Bhatia",
year = "1996",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "44",
pages = "75A",
journal = "Journal of Investigative Medicine",
issn = "1081-5589",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - School-aged follow-up of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) survivors

AU - Gangarosa, M. E.

AU - Bunyapen, C.

AU - Cohen, M. J.

AU - Kanto, W. P.

AU - Bhatia, J.

PY - 1996/1/1

Y1 - 1996/1/1

N2 - Prior results on 6 year old ECMO survivors showed that only those with neonatal seizures performed poorly on some measures of intelligence, language, and academic skills. This study included 23, 7-9 year old ECMO graduates. Similar measures of intellectual, language, and academic skills were used in conjunction with memory and sensory-motor measures. Moreover, Language, Visual-Spatial, Verbal Memory, and Visual Memory Standard Score Quotients were created by grouping subtests purported to measure these constructs. Groups were divided by neurological findings (15 abnormal; 8 normal). No significant differences were detected. However, those children with abnormal findings approached significance on the Language, Visual-Spatial, and Visual Memory Quotients, the Stanford-Binet (4th ed.) Composite, the Arithmetic subtest of the Wide Range Achievement Test-Rev., and Failure to Maintain Set on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. A case-by-case analysis performed with the GA State Special Education Regulations revealed that 50% with normal and 53% with abnormal findings fit the criteria for a Learning Disability (LD). Thus, despite infant neurological status, school-aged ECMO survivors are at a 3 fold risk of having a LD compared to normals (14%). Further studies are needed to determine whether hypoxia and/or ECMO (specifically) contributes to this risk.

AB - Prior results on 6 year old ECMO survivors showed that only those with neonatal seizures performed poorly on some measures of intelligence, language, and academic skills. This study included 23, 7-9 year old ECMO graduates. Similar measures of intellectual, language, and academic skills were used in conjunction with memory and sensory-motor measures. Moreover, Language, Visual-Spatial, Verbal Memory, and Visual Memory Standard Score Quotients were created by grouping subtests purported to measure these constructs. Groups were divided by neurological findings (15 abnormal; 8 normal). No significant differences were detected. However, those children with abnormal findings approached significance on the Language, Visual-Spatial, and Visual Memory Quotients, the Stanford-Binet (4th ed.) Composite, the Arithmetic subtest of the Wide Range Achievement Test-Rev., and Failure to Maintain Set on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. A case-by-case analysis performed with the GA State Special Education Regulations revealed that 50% with normal and 53% with abnormal findings fit the criteria for a Learning Disability (LD). Thus, despite infant neurological status, school-aged ECMO survivors are at a 3 fold risk of having a LD compared to normals (14%). Further studies are needed to determine whether hypoxia and/or ECMO (specifically) contributes to this risk.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33749556755&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33749556755&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:33749556755

VL - 44

SP - 75A

JO - Journal of Investigative Medicine

JF - Journal of Investigative Medicine

SN - 1081-5589

IS - 1

ER -