Searching for signals in the noise: Metabolomics in chemical ecology

Emily Katherine Prince, Georg Pohnert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chemically mediated interactions between organisms influence ecosystem structure, making it crucial for ecologists to understand these interactions. Advances in chemical ecology have often been closely linked to advances in analytical chemistry techniques. One recent development is the use of metabolomics to address questions in chemical ecology. Although metabolomics has much to offer this field, it is not without drawbacks. Here we consider how metabolomics techniques can supplement the traditional bioassay-guided fractionation approach to chemical ecology. We focus on specific examples that illustrate the advantages that metabolomic methods can provide over other methods in order to understand chemically mediated interactions between organisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-197
Number of pages5
JournalAnalytical and bioanalytical chemistry
Volume396
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Fingerprint

Metabolomics
Ecology
Noise
Analytical Chemistry Techniques
Bioassay
Fractionation
Biological Assay
Ecosystems
Ecosystem
Chemical analysis

Keywords

  • Brassicaceae
  • Caenorhabditis elegans
  • Chemical signaling
  • Metabolic fingerprinting
  • Metabolic profiling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Searching for signals in the noise : Metabolomics in chemical ecology. / Prince, Emily Katherine; Pohnert, Georg.

In: Analytical and bioanalytical chemistry, Vol. 396, No. 1, 01.01.2010, p. 193-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Prince, Emily Katherine ; Pohnert, Georg. / Searching for signals in the noise : Metabolomics in chemical ecology. In: Analytical and bioanalytical chemistry. 2010 ; Vol. 396, No. 1. pp. 193-197.
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