Seizures as a predictor of long-term neurodevelopmental outcome in survivors of neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)

Anjali P. Parish, Chantrapa Bunyapen, Morris J. Cohen, Tara Garrison, Jatinder J Bhatia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A longitudinal, prospective study was conducted to determine the long-term neurodevelopmental outcome in neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) survivors with and without seizures. One hundred sixty-two ECMO survivors from March 1985 until November 1995 were eligible for follow-up. Sixty-four returned at preschool age (4-6 years). Thirty-nine infants did not experience neonatal seizures (group 1); however, 25 exhibited seizures before or during ECMO (group 2). Twelve infants referred for ECMO, but managed medically, served as a clinical comparison group (group 3). At school age (7-9 years), 32 ECMO children (16 with seizures) returned for neuropsychologic evaluation. The results indicated that the preschool seizure group (group 2) demonstrated a significantly lower mean IQ than group 1 or 3 (P = .002). Furthermore, 56% of group 2 had IQ scores ≤ 84 (≥ 1 SD below the mean). Group 2 also exhibited significantly higher rates of cerebral palsy (P ≤ .001 and speech-language disorder than group 1 or 3 (P < .001). At school age, the seizure group continued to perform below average on intelligence testing, with 50% scoring ≤ 84 and 38% receiving special education. This study extends the previous findings that seizures associated with neonatal ECMO are a primary risk factor for neurodevelopmental sequelae and confirms the need for long-term follow-up to assist with academic programming.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)930-934
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Child Neurology
Volume19
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Fingerprint

Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Seizures
Apraxias
Special Education
Cerebral Palsy
Intelligence
Longitudinal Studies
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Seizures as a predictor of long-term neurodevelopmental outcome in survivors of neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). / Parish, Anjali P.; Bunyapen, Chantrapa; Cohen, Morris J.; Garrison, Tara; Bhatia, Jatinder J.

In: Journal of Child Neurology, Vol. 19, No. 12, 01.01.2004, p. 930-934.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Parish, Anjali P. ; Bunyapen, Chantrapa ; Cohen, Morris J. ; Garrison, Tara ; Bhatia, Jatinder J. / Seizures as a predictor of long-term neurodevelopmental outcome in survivors of neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). In: Journal of Child Neurology. 2004 ; Vol. 19, No. 12. pp. 930-934.
@article{e5f0c5ed8fa54f6ca0c34a3584c101c9,
title = "Seizures as a predictor of long-term neurodevelopmental outcome in survivors of neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)",
abstract = "A longitudinal, prospective study was conducted to determine the long-term neurodevelopmental outcome in neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) survivors with and without seizures. One hundred sixty-two ECMO survivors from March 1985 until November 1995 were eligible for follow-up. Sixty-four returned at preschool age (4-6 years). Thirty-nine infants did not experience neonatal seizures (group 1); however, 25 exhibited seizures before or during ECMO (group 2). Twelve infants referred for ECMO, but managed medically, served as a clinical comparison group (group 3). At school age (7-9 years), 32 ECMO children (16 with seizures) returned for neuropsychologic evaluation. The results indicated that the preschool seizure group (group 2) demonstrated a significantly lower mean IQ than group 1 or 3 (P = .002). Furthermore, 56{\%} of group 2 had IQ scores ≤ 84 (≥ 1 SD below the mean). Group 2 also exhibited significantly higher rates of cerebral palsy (P ≤ .001 and speech-language disorder than group 1 or 3 (P < .001). At school age, the seizure group continued to perform below average on intelligence testing, with 50{\%} scoring ≤ 84 and 38{\%} receiving special education. This study extends the previous findings that seizures associated with neonatal ECMO are a primary risk factor for neurodevelopmental sequelae and confirms the need for long-term follow-up to assist with academic programming.",
author = "Parish, {Anjali P.} and Chantrapa Bunyapen and Cohen, {Morris J.} and Tara Garrison and Bhatia, {Jatinder J}",
year = "2004",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/08830738040190120401",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "930--934",
journal = "Journal of Child Neurology",
issn = "0883-0738",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Seizures as a predictor of long-term neurodevelopmental outcome in survivors of neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)

AU - Parish, Anjali P.

AU - Bunyapen, Chantrapa

AU - Cohen, Morris J.

AU - Garrison, Tara

AU - Bhatia, Jatinder J

PY - 2004/1/1

Y1 - 2004/1/1

N2 - A longitudinal, prospective study was conducted to determine the long-term neurodevelopmental outcome in neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) survivors with and without seizures. One hundred sixty-two ECMO survivors from March 1985 until November 1995 were eligible for follow-up. Sixty-four returned at preschool age (4-6 years). Thirty-nine infants did not experience neonatal seizures (group 1); however, 25 exhibited seizures before or during ECMO (group 2). Twelve infants referred for ECMO, but managed medically, served as a clinical comparison group (group 3). At school age (7-9 years), 32 ECMO children (16 with seizures) returned for neuropsychologic evaluation. The results indicated that the preschool seizure group (group 2) demonstrated a significantly lower mean IQ than group 1 or 3 (P = .002). Furthermore, 56% of group 2 had IQ scores ≤ 84 (≥ 1 SD below the mean). Group 2 also exhibited significantly higher rates of cerebral palsy (P ≤ .001 and speech-language disorder than group 1 or 3 (P < .001). At school age, the seizure group continued to perform below average on intelligence testing, with 50% scoring ≤ 84 and 38% receiving special education. This study extends the previous findings that seizures associated with neonatal ECMO are a primary risk factor for neurodevelopmental sequelae and confirms the need for long-term follow-up to assist with academic programming.

AB - A longitudinal, prospective study was conducted to determine the long-term neurodevelopmental outcome in neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) survivors with and without seizures. One hundred sixty-two ECMO survivors from March 1985 until November 1995 were eligible for follow-up. Sixty-four returned at preschool age (4-6 years). Thirty-nine infants did not experience neonatal seizures (group 1); however, 25 exhibited seizures before or during ECMO (group 2). Twelve infants referred for ECMO, but managed medically, served as a clinical comparison group (group 3). At school age (7-9 years), 32 ECMO children (16 with seizures) returned for neuropsychologic evaluation. The results indicated that the preschool seizure group (group 2) demonstrated a significantly lower mean IQ than group 1 or 3 (P = .002). Furthermore, 56% of group 2 had IQ scores ≤ 84 (≥ 1 SD below the mean). Group 2 also exhibited significantly higher rates of cerebral palsy (P ≤ .001 and speech-language disorder than group 1 or 3 (P < .001). At school age, the seizure group continued to perform below average on intelligence testing, with 50% scoring ≤ 84 and 38% receiving special education. This study extends the previous findings that seizures associated with neonatal ECMO are a primary risk factor for neurodevelopmental sequelae and confirms the need for long-term follow-up to assist with academic programming.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=13444266251&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=13444266251&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/08830738040190120401

DO - 10.1177/08830738040190120401

M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 930

EP - 934

JO - Journal of Child Neurology

JF - Journal of Child Neurology

SN - 0883-0738

IS - 12

ER -